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Worms. They wriggle they wobble and they eat the food you left on your plate. Big thank you to the MSU Recycling Center and Surplus store for giving me a tour. I love my job. Special Guest: Sean Barton https://msurecycling.com/vermicompost/ Special Tunes: The Freezer Bees https://open.spotify.com/artist/1q31dwXas9055bylUCkEMp?si=PVbBO5mwRsywu18FkJM…
 
10 cents doesn't sound like a whole lot for a meal... but we learn why Michigan schools and child care programs benefit so much from that boost. Even the farms profit! Fruits, veggies, and legumes for all! Special Guest: Melanie Wong Special Thanks: Amanda Brezzell More about 10 cents: https://www.tencentsmichigan.org/ Good Tunes: The Freezer Bees …
 
Now read the title to the tune of "Hello, Goodbye" by the Beatles. It's what Cassidy would have wanted. This is Cassidy's final episode of The Food Fix. Now that she's graduated with her degree in environmental science, she's taking some time to travel and unwind. But she plans to keep working in audio, so give her a Google search in a few months. …
 
First of all, octopuses are the coolest animals ever. Second of all, it's octopuses, not octopi. Third of all, octopuses are super resilient. Remember climate change? That thing killing the polar bears? Well it's also killing a lot of the fish that you like to eat. But not octopuses. Why? Refer back to point number one. And also listen to this epis…
 
Battle of the cinnamon rolls. In this extra sweet sequel, Cassidy chats with co-reporter Jake Christie to get to the bottom of the biggest question you were probably left with after the perennial grains episode. Do... they... taste... good? Eat breakfast alongside us this week, and as a refresher check out Jake's perennial grains story: Perennial g…
 
I know I know. Cassidy, the vegan, is promoting hunting on her show? Sounds fishy. Well believe it or not, Cassidy isn't totally anti-meat consumption. She's just anti-unsustainable meat consumption. Most of the meat you buy at the store has been grown, harvested, processed and shipped in a way that will be detrimental to the environment if we keep…
 
I mean come on was the title not enough of a grab? Everyone loves space... probably. How do astronauts eat in zero gravity? Can we grow food in space? Why should you be concerned with the 96 bags of human waste we've left on the moon? I mean surely you're hooked by now, but for those of you still on the fence, you should know that Cassidy has two g…
 
Crayfish? Crawfish? Crawdads? Regardless, they're terrorizing the state of Minnesota with their tiny claws and big appetites. The rusty crayfish is invasive in Minnesota, and they've become a massive problem. But Garrett Lima and Yusef Orest came up with a clever solution, and an even more clever catch phrase (in Cassidy's opinion). "If ya can't be…
 
You sleep in a storage container. You poop in a bucket. You pick weeds under the hot sun for six hours a day. You live on a mountain and wait for food to be delivered every week, and when it gets there, you hide all the chocolate from your roommates. And you're not paid. BUT... you're in Hawaii. How long could you last? Workaway programs like WWOOF…
 
Picture this: a world where you're surrounded by free food. The only catch is if you eat the wrong thing you'll drop dead... or at least, get really sick. Well that world is Earth- you just probably don't see it that way. But Gabrielle sure does. In warm months, 80 percent of her diet is made up of food she just finds outside. And no, she's not rai…
 
Want a taste of farming without committing to a career of it? Want to hear Cassidy reminisce on her farm days? Want to learn about abandoned reindeer? Well, we don't really cover that last question, but the words "abandoned reindeer" are actually spoken in this episode and that should be enough to get you hooked. Here's the deal: - Farmers are old …
 
PERENNIAL GRAINS BABY! What if our crops grew back every year like your lawn does every spring? I know what you're thinking. "Cassidy, you're off your rocker. Everyone knows that almost all food plants are grown as annuals, and that's why we need farmers to replant them every year. It's genetically impossible to create perennial crops in our lifeti…
 
Why are the hippies always screaming about "saving the bees?" Well because the hippies are smart. Don't disrespect the hippies. Bees make the world go round! Bees make plants grow and plants make food grow. And now that urban agriculture is gaining traction, we need bees in the city. This week Cassidy interviews Brian Peterson-Roest, one of the fou…
 
Remember at the peak of COVID when there was a meat shortage across the Unites States? Long story short, that issue stemmed back to our heavy reliance on a few major meat packaging factories. If we had more ways of obtaining out meat, that probably wouldn't have happened. This was the example Greg Shweser gave when talking about the goal of deep wi…
 
In this episode, Cassidy finally reveals that she's vegan, and then spends a few minutes yelling about it. But if you can get past her tone, you'll learn that meat consumption is huge source of fossil fuel emissions in the western world. Plant-based meats have become a valuable tool in addressing this issue, but that didn't sound like nearly as fun…
 
Not so fun fact about the Earth- our population is growing and our land is not. We've got a lot of people to feed and not a lot of space to do it. But what if there were a way to grow more food on less land? Oh wait, there is! This week host Cassidy Hough interviews Connor Culbertson, a real-life permaculture farmer from Piedmont, Virginia. Take a …
 
The Netherlands is the second largest exporter of agriculture products in the world- behind the United States. To decrease the environmental toll that standard fertilizers have on the planet, the Dutch are toying with the idea of using human waste instead. But is it effective? Would people buy that food? Dr. Marijn Poortvliet surveyed around to fin…
 
In Taylor's last episode as podcast host she covers a study that found eating at least two servings of avocado a week might lower your risk of cardiovascular disease. Follow us and join the conversation @msufoodfix on Facebook and Twitter. For more information: Avocado Consumption and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in US Adults Theme music: Upbeat …
 
In today's episode our host, Taylor Haelterman, answers some of the most frequently asked questions about her work covering food innovation and research. Follow us and join the conversation @msufoodfix on Facebook and Twitter. For more information (in order of mention): USDA Food Security Information Research and innovation as a catalyst for food s…
 
In this episode, two researchers discuss their work collecting pumpkin seeds from farmers in Egypt with the goals of conservation and fighting food insecurity. The seeds were analyzed to see if the local varieties can be used to grow future pumpkins that are well adapted to the environment and nutritious. Follow us and join the conversation @msufoo…
 
Did you know that over 90% of the wild-caught fish used to feed farmed salmon are food-grade, meaning they could be consumed by humans? So why aren't they fed to humans? And can salmon be farmed more efficiently? Today's guest, David WIller, is a zoology research fellow at the University of Cambridge, and he has the answers. Follow us and join the …
 
In the first in-person interview episode since the re-launch, Taylor speaks to a PhD candidate at Wageningen University about using waste from insect production (as in insects used for food and feed) to create sustainable crops by promoting plant growth, health, pollination and resilience. Follow us and join the conversation @msufoodfix on Facebook…
 
Today Jessica Bayes joins the podcast to discuss her study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. It found that young men who switched from a poor diet to a healthy mediterranean diet saw improvements in their depression symptoms. For some, it was improvement enough to go from a medium to severe depression symptoms classification to classif…
 
Today the president of the Baltimore Orchard Project, Deborah Howard, joins the podcast to talk about how the volunteer run non-profit plants fruit trees across the city. The team has planted over 2,000 fruit trees across Baltimore, Maryland, since 2012 and has harvested over 16,000 pounds of fruit. Much of which is given to non-profits and food ba…
 
As the human population increases and finding more protein options becomes critical, seaweed growers may be able to use leftover water from the food industry as a fertilizer to make the plant grow faster and contain more protein. Kristoffer Stedt, a PhD Student in the Department of Marine Sciences at the University of Gothenburg and lead author of …
 
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