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Take a fact-based journey through the cosmos. Tune in to hear weekly discussions on astronomical topics ranging from planets to cosmology. Hosted by Fraser Cain (Universe Today) and Dr. Pamela L. Gay (Planetary Science Institute), this show brings the questions of an avid astronomy lover direct to an astronomer. Together Fraser and Pamela explore what is known and being discovered about the universe around us. Astronomy Cast is supported thru patreon.com/AstronomyCast.
 
The 365 Days of Astronomy podcast launched in 2009 as part of the International Year of Astronomy. This community podcast continues to bring you day after day of content across the years. Everyday, a new voice, helping you see the universe we share in a new way. This show is managed by Avivah Yamani, edited by Richard Drumm. This podcast is funded through Patreon.com/CosmoQuestX and produced out of the Planetary Science Institute.
 
The Hebridean Dark Skies Festival presents a series of interviews with fascinating people from the worlds of astronomy, psychology, and the arts, exploring our festival themes of winter, darkness and the night sky. The Hebridean Dark Skies Festival is an ambitious annual programme of events taking place each February on the Isle of Lewis, including live music, film, visual art, theatre, astronomy talks, and stargazing. The Hebridean Dark Skies Festival is part-financed by the Scottish Govern ...
 
The Cincinnati Observatory, with its hulking, one-of-a-kind antique telescope, has been a staple institution of the Cincinnati science scene since its founding in 1842. The Observatory has changed its location and invested in more up-to-date technology since then, but it is still just as important a mover and shaker in astronomical observation as well as the education and outreach that keeps Cincinnati and member station listeners across the country Looking Up.Dean Regas and Anna Hehman of t ...
 
April Vihilidal’s recent Archeo-astronomical discovery, of August 2012, is the Archeo-astronomical find of the time. She has labeled her find, 'The Shadow Phenomenon of the Sphinx'. Her pod casts are aimed at educating people about her Archeo-astronomical find. April Vihilidal aspires to share her knowledge about Ancient Cultures and their relevance in today's modern society. She holds the intent of educating her audience concerning Precession of the Equinoxes. She desires to communicate wit ...
 
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show series
 
http://www.astronomycast.com/archive/ From July 16, 2007. This week we wanted to give you a basic physics lesson. This isn’t easy physics, this is a lesson on the basic numbers of the Universe. Each of these numbers define a key aspect of our Universe. If they had different values, the Universe would be a changed place, and life here on Earth would…
 
In this week’s mini-episode, we chat with Liantsoa Finaritra Randrianjanahary who is a PhD candidate at the University of the Western Cape (UWC). Liantsoa works in the field of cosmology which means he is researching the whole universe as one entity rather than focusing on the individual contents of the universe such as stars and galaxies. Check ou…
 
http://spacescoop.org/en/scoops/2111/an-ancient-stormy-black-hole/ In the very distant past, 13.1 billion years ago, a supermassive black hole, they’re called SMBHs for short, spewed a humongous amount of galactic wind. It’s a gigantic flow of gas that blew away the material that forms stars, also called ISM or interstellar medium, the stuff betwee…
 
Libraries have long been a great resource for access to knowledge and media you might not otherwise be able to afford. Thanks to a partnership with the Cincinnati Observatory (and Dean), star gazers in the Cincinnati region can add telescopes to that list of resources.
 
Using a simple model based on granular physics, like those used for modeling sand or sugar deposits, scientists have recreated the diamond shape of asteroids Ryugu and Bennu in computer simulations. Plus, the origins of loner dwarf galaxies and this week’s What’s Up. We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosti…
 
George’s Random Astronomical Object presents the star HD 191089. Astronomers may not have found an exoplanet orbiting this star, but they found the next best thing. Brief biographgy: George Bendo is an astronomer who specializes in studying interstellar dust and star formation in nearby galaxies. He currently works at the Jodrell Bank Centre for As…
 
What kind of signals are we searching for from aliens? What are technosignatures and biosignatures? How are we looking for non-intelligent life? Is there any hope of finding life in our own solar system? I discuss these questions and more in today’s Ask a Spaceman! Support the show: http://www.patreon.com/pmsutter All episodes: http://www.AskASpace…
 
Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - Teddy Pruyne discovered Comet P/2019 X1 (Pruyne) in Gemini. - Zdnenek Bardon in the Czech Republic was surprised, while takin…
 
Hycean worlds have hydrogen-rich atmospheres and are covered in oceans, making them prime candidates for the search for life outside our own solar system. These worlds are also more numerous and easier to find than Earth-like exoplanets. Plus, an update on the search for Planet 9 and how volcanoes may provide a climate safety valve. We've added a n…
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HP-5ij5xTNU From December 17, 2019. As I’m recording this video near the end of 2019, the total number of confirmed exoplanets stands at 4,104. We’ve come a long way since the discovery of the first exoplanet orbiting a sunlike star back in 1995 with 51 Pegasi b. And the reality is that the race to find new exoplanet…
 
Hosted by Chris Beckett & Shane Ludtke, two amateur astronomers in Saskatchewan. Chris & Shane answer some listener emails. We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your frie…
 
Paul Hill, Ralph Wilkins and Dr. Jenifer Millard host. Damien Phillips, John Wildridge and Dustin Ruoff produce. The Discussion: Our practical astronomy gathering is back – join us in Wales on 2-5th October. Jen is contributing to Andy Oppenheimer’s book Stars of Orion. Submit your support for Lego to create a clockwork solar system. Watch Jen’s fr…
 
Welcome to Observing With Webb, where a high school astronomy teacher tells you what you’re looking at, why it’s so cool, and what you should check out later this month…at night. Three great planets all visible right after sunset, with visits from the Moon, make September of 2021 a calm, but convenient month for breaking out that telescope. Sunset …
 
http://www.astronomycast.com/archive/ From March 15, 2010. Everything in the Universe is spinning. In fact, without this rotation, life on Earth wouldn’t exist. We need the conservation of angular momentum to flatten out galaxies and solar systems, to make planets possible. Let’s find out about the physics involved with everything that spins, and f…
 
Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - The International Asteroid Warning Network, or IWAN, has been established to link scientists who are discovering, monitoring,…
 
Scott Shepperd normally studies objects in the distant solar system. Recently he turned his attention toward the inner solar system and discovered the fastest moving asteroid currently known. In this podcast, Scott tells the fascinating tale of the discovery and what we can learn about our solar system from these objects. Bio: Rob Sparks is in the …
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpunfQb8OVU The race is on to find life in other places in the Solar System, from underground reservoirs on Mars to the subsurface oceans on Europa and Enceladus. If spacecraft, rovers or even astronauts make the momentous discovery of life on another world, that’ll just open up new questions. Did it originate all on…
 
https://spacescoop.org/en/scoops/2116/the-usain-bolt-of-asteroids/ On August 13, 2021, astronomers made an amazing discovery. They found an asteroid that is closer to our Sun than any other space rock. Its closest approach to the Sun is 20 million kilometers or 12 million miles. That’s 0.13 au or 13% of the average distance from Earth to the Sun. T…
 
Based on X-ray detections from the Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory, scientists used the Chandra X-ray Observatory and found rings called light echoes moving out from a black hole and its companion star, reflecting off the surrounding dust clouds. Plus, solving the puzzle of the Sun and using glassy nodules to find a meteorite impact. We've added a n…
 
Why is James Clerk Maxwell so dang awesome? How was he able to unify the forces of electricity and magnetism? Why was his work so revolutionary? I discuss these questions and more in today’s Ask a Spaceman! Support the show: http://www.patreon.com/pmsutter All episodes: http://www.AskASpaceman.com Follow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/PaulMattS…
 
http://www.astronomycast.com/archive/ From November 24, 2008. As part of her trip to England, Pamela had a chance to sit down with Oxford astrophysicist Chris Lintott and record an episode of Astronomy Cast. From the first stars to the newest planets, molecules and the chemistry that allows them to form affects all aspects of astronomy. While most …
 
Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - Images of the quiet Sun during a solar minimum make it look like a relatively static peaceful place. - Greg Leonard discovere…
 
Evidence, schmevidence. - Are there really primordial black holes? - What do you make of the helical drive? We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the…
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0SMNucXwgo On October 19th, 2017 astronomers detected the first interstellar asteroid (or maybe comet) passing through the Solar System: Oumuamua. It had a brief encounter with the inner Solar System and then hurtled back out into interstellar space. Once astronomers noticed it, they directed the world’s telescopes …
 
Hosted by Chris Beckett & Shane Ludtke, two amateur astronomers in Saskatchewan. One target of note is Kemble’s Cascade in Camelopardalis. From Wikipedia: “The asterism was named by Walter Scott Houston in honor of Father Lucian Kemble (1922–1999), a Franciscan friar and amateur astronomer who wrote a letter to Houston about the asterism, describin…
 
Paul Hill, Ralph Wilkins and Dr. Jenifer Millard host. Damien Phillips, John Wildridge and Dustin Ruoff produce. The Discussion: - Jeni nearly joined a cult. - Farewell to Carolyn Shoemaker. - The Room of Doom at Redditch Astronomical Society. - The new updated https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/sky-guide/id576588894 Sky Guide app (that Jen works on). -…
 
Using a neutron spectrometer onboard the Dawn spacecraft, scientists have found elevated concentrations of hydrogen in Ceres’ Occator Crater, which provides evidence of an icy crust. Plus, everything is on fire in the western United States, and we review “The Past is Red” by Catherynne M. Valente. We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astr…
 
http://www.astronomycast.com/archive/ From September 18, 2008. As you know, we wanted to answer listener questions regularly, but we found it was taking away from the regular weekly episodes of Astronomy Cast. So we’ve decided to just split it up and run the question shows separately from the regular Astronomy Cast episodes. If this works out, you …
 
Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - Kacper Wierzchos & Teddy Pruyne were asteroid hunting in the constellation of Virgo and discovered 2020 CD3, a temporary natu…
 
In this mini-episode, we talk with Bret Yotti a student and teaching assistant from the University of Cape Town (UCT) as well as a presenter at the Iziko Planetarium in Cape Town. We look at Bret's journey in astronomy and why he chose this path. We also find out about his life as a teaching assistant whilst being a student as well at UCT and the w…
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFRLnDtAGg0 People always ask me how I think humanity will react if we discover life somewhere out there in the Universe, whether it’s bacteria under the surface of Mars, a biosignature of alien life in the atmosphere of another world, or a radio signal from another civilization. - Will our civilization lose its coll…
 
She was born on December 11, 1865 in Dover, Delaware. Her parents were Wilson Cannon and Mary Jump. Her father was a shipbuilder and also a state senator, and her mother is the one who got her interested in astronomy and mathematics. She attended what will later be known as Wesley College in Delaware, and then transferred to Wellesley College in Ma…
 
Paul Hill, Ralph Wilkins and Dr. Jenifer Millard host. Damien Phillips, John Wildridge and Dustin Ruoff produce. This podcast extra (with Dr. Jen hosting!) is all about our favourite topic of them all, exoplanets. Thanks to our good friends Ian and Billy, we'll be taking a look at the very exciting upcoming low-Earth orbit space mission Twinkle. Th…
 
NASA’s TESS spacecraft, which is primarily used to search for exoplanets, has now observed a veritable symphony of pulsating red giant stars, each with their own internal vibrations. This work was presented at this week’s TESS Science Conference. Plus, some more climate change news (bad) and superflares may be less harmful to exoplanets than though…
 
http://www.astronomycast.com/archive/ From September 8, 2008. After a quick Dragon*Con break, we’re back to our tour through the fundamental forces of the Universe. We’ve covered gravity and electromagnetism, and now we’re moving onto the strong and weak nuclear forces. We didn’t think they’d really need to be separate episodes, so we’re putting th…
 
Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Published March 26, 2020. Today's 2 topics: - Elizabeth Williams graduated from MIT in 1903, and used the motions of Uranus and Neptune to predic…
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yC2rq7JB_YU Automating an observing run is one of the most efficient uses of your equipment. You can plan the night's observing, then let your equipment do the work! But what do you need to make this possible? What can you expect for results? We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing…
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olFeKZugDEM When we send anything to space, we have to pay an enormous amount of money. That’s because you need to push satellites, water, astronauts up and out of the Earth’s gravity well. Whether you’re just going to orbit, or heading to the Moon, or out into deep space, it makes the most sense to build your struct…
 
Hosted by Chris Beckett & Shane Ludtke, two amateur astronomers in Saskatchewan. We have lots of people who write us and share their star stories and so we will read a few of these ones tonight. I think we've we've had quite a few. I didn't put Clark's in about RS Ophuichi. But we kind of mentioned them a little bit in the last episode and we did h…
 
Paul Hill, Ralph Wilkins and Dr. Jenifer Millard host. Damien Phillips, John Wildridge and Dustin Ruoff produce. The Discussion: Presenting on the BBC. The importance of dust to astronomy. The News: A round up of current Mars exploration from Perseverence, Ingenuity ( Google "raised ridges" ) and Hope & Zhurong. The Boeing gremlins continue. Bezos …
 
Part 2 of 2! How did the observation of a kilonova change astronomy? How did that one observation kill off alternate models of gravity? What’s in store for the future of gravitational waves? I discuss these questions and more in today’s Ask a Spaceman! Support the show: http://www.patreon.com/pmsutter All episodes: http://www.AskASpaceman.com Follo…
 
http://www.astronomycast.com/archive/ From September 21, 2009. This week we’re going to talk about famous stars. But not those boring human ones you read about in People magazine. No. We’re talking about those hot balls of plasma across the distant Universe. The close ones, the bright ones, the massive ones, the giant ones. The explodey ones. Let’s…
 
Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - The hunt is on for Earth like planets which are close enough for us to study in detail. Like TOI 700 d… - Carson Fuls discove…
 
Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are some of the most energetic events in the universe. There are two categories of GRBs: short and long. Extensive studies of a recent GRB show the dividing line between short and long is not clear as this “long” GRB was exceptionally short! Learn how Tomás Ahumada and a team of astronomers used data from a wide variety of t…
 
Hosted by your Director, Avivah Yanami. Today Avivah relates a story from Korea about Canopus or Alpha Carinae, the brightest star in the constellation of Carina and the second-brightest star in the night sky. We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.…
 
The Actual Astronomy Podcast presents The Light Pollution Edition. This episode features our guest Dave Chapman who shares his unplanned observation of the Gegenschein from the Winter Star Party in Florida, US. We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon…
 
http://spacescoop.org/en/scoops/2104/dizzy-crazy-spinning-brown-dwarfs/ Often called ‘failed stars’, brown dwarfs are halfway between a star and a planet. They form like stars but are more like giant planets. In fact, they are bigger than planets, but smaller than stars: they can have a pretty similar diameter to Jupiter, so they’re not much bigger…
 
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