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Word of the Day

Word of the Day

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The huge Amazon Alexa hit Word of the Day is now available as a podcast! Word of the Day teaches you a useful word, its definition, etymology, and gives you examples of how to use it in a sentence. A new word each and every day! Perfect for those looking to expand their vocabulary, learning English and looking for a boost and anyone who loves words.
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Culinary Word of the Day

Jenn de la Vega

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Culinary Word of the Day is hosted by chef and author Jenn de la Vega. Subscribe to short, educational weekly dispatches to expand your vocabulary of the comestible across agriculture, technology, cooking techniques, food trends, and international cuisine. Esculentè is a behind-the-scenes conversation podcast hosted by Jenn de la Vega and research producer Alicia Book. For every three culinary words, Jenn and Alicia discuss material from the cutting room floor in a series of bonus episodes. ...
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Welcome to Tony Sam's Word of the Day Podcast! You may think you know what words mean, but YOU DON'T! Lucky for you, Tony Sam DOES. Tony Sam graduated magna cum laude from the Harvard School of Law and has been fascinated with the evolution of the English language as far back as he can remember. Currently serving as a Judge in the 23rd Circuit Court of Illinois, he finds time to learn more about words whenever he’s not walking his prized Labrador, Marshall. His other accolades include gradua ...
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Mendicant is a noun that refers to a beggar. The Latin verb mendicare (med duh CAR ay) refers to a ‘beggar.’ Our word of the day entered English in the Late Middle English period. Here’s an example of it in use: Jeff spent many years on the street as a mendicant. Being a beggar has a way of putting your success into perspective.…
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Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 24, 2024 is: voracious • \vaw-RAY-shus\ • adjective Voracious describes someone who has a huge appetite. It can also be used figuratively to mean "excessively eager," as in "a voracious reader." // It seemed like the voracious kitten was eating her weight in food every day. // She has her voracious app…
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Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
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Jeremiad is a noun that refers to a list of complaints. Our word of the day has its origin in the Biblical figure Jeremiah, whose lamentations were featured in the Old Testament. Since the late 18th century, a jeremiad has been known as a series of criticisms. Here’s an example of it in use: After several years of living with Cheryl, I’ve gathered …
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Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 23, 2024 is: opprobrium • \uh-PROH-bree-um\ • noun Opprobrium refers to very strong disapproval or criticism of a person or thing especially by a large number of people. // They're going ahead with the plan despite public opprobrium. See the entry > Examples: "Caught up in a whirlwind of public opprobr…
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Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
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Jardiniere is a noun that refers to an ornamental pot or stand for plants for flowers. Our word of the day is a loan word that comes directly from the French word for ‘gardener.’ It’s been used since the mid-19th century to describe places to display plants or flowers. Here’s an example: When I first saw that jardiniere, I assumed it was from somep…
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Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 22, 2024 is: haggard • \HAG-urd\ • adjective Someone described as haggard appears tired or thin especially as if because of hunger, worry, or pain. Haggard can also describe someone who looks wild or otherwise disheveled. // After a disastrous rafting trip, Robin emerged from the woods looking haggard …
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Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
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Schlep is a verb that means to haul or carry in an awkward way. Our word of the day comes from the Yiddish word ‘shepn’ (SHLEP - in.) which means ‘to drag.’ Its English offspring has been around since the early 20th century. Here’s an example: Next year when we go on vacation, I think I’ll leave my computer at home. It’s too much trouble to schlep …
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Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 21, 2024 is: lampoon • \lam-POON\ • verb To lampoon someone or something is to ridicule that person or thing, especially through the use of harsh satire. // The exhibit chronicles the long history of lampooning public figures in cartoons. See the entry > Examples: "'An exciting element of this to me wa…
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Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
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Jactitation is a noun that refers to the restless tossing of a body. The Latin word jactare (jock TAR ay) means ’to toss.’ Its English variation has been around since the 16th century, getting most of its use in a medical context. Here’s an example: All that jactitation I heard on the other side of the bed had me worried about my wife’s health. But…
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Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 20, 2024 is: buttress • \BUTT-russ\ • noun A buttress is a structure built against a wall in order to support or strengthen it. More broadly, buttress may refer to anything that supports or strengthens. Buttress may also refer to something that resembles a buttress, such as a projecting part of a mount…
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Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
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Jacquerie is a noun that refers to a peasant’s revolt. Our word of the day comes from the French name ‘Jacques’ (zhock) which was a common name among the poor and working class. The term was first used to describe a revolt that took place against the ruling class in the 14th century. It later came to refer to any sort of revolt or protest. Here’s a…
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Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 19, 2024 is: prestigious • \preh-STIH-juss\ • adjective Something described as prestigious has the respect and admiration that someone or something gets for being successful or important. // Chelsea’s mom often bragged about her daughter’s job at the prestigious company. See the entry > Examples: “Emma…
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Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
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Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 18, 2024 is: fathom • \FA-thum\ • verb To fathom something is to understand the reason for its existence or occurrence. // Even those close to him can't always fathom why he repeatedly risks his life to climb the world’s tallest mountains. See the entry > Examples: "Oppenheimer provides an opportunity …
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Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
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Presentism is an attitude toward the past dominated by present-day beliefs. A recent addition to the English language, presentism emerged in the late 20th century to describe a tendency to view the past through the lens of current conventions. It combines the word ‘present,’ a word of Middle English origin with the suffix I-S-M, which denotes a dis…
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Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 17, 2024 is: rapport • \ra-POR\ • noun When you have a rapport with someone, your relationship is characterized by agreement, mutual understanding, or empathy that makes communication possible or easy. // Once our daughter had developed a rapport with her piano teacher, she began to show some real enth…
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Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
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Endarken is a verb that means to make dark or darker. You can think of the word endarken as a counterpoint to ‘enlighten.’ Both take words of Old English origin and add the prefix E-N which expresses entry into a specified state or location. Here’s an example of endarken in use: Every time we start talking about camping our friend Sam seems to enda…
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Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 16, 2024 is: turbid • \TER-bid\ • adjective Turbid is a formal word that has several meanings having to do with literal or figurative muddiness or cloudiness. It's most often used literally to describe water that is thick or opaque with stirred-up sediment, as in "the river's turbid waters"; similarly,…
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Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
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Forgettery is a noun that refers to the tendency to forget. Our word of the day is a neologism, meaning it’s a recent addition to the English language. Forgettery combines a word of Old English origin that means ‘fail to remember’ with the suffix E-R-Y which denotes a behavior. We see this also in words like bravery, tomfoolery and archery. Forgett…
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Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 15, 2024 is: enervate • \EN-er-vayt\ • verb Enervate is a formal word used for situations in which someone or something is being sapped of physical or mental vigor, vitality, or strength. The verb is most common in the participial forms enervated and enervating, as in "children enervated by the summer …
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Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
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Scroyle is a noun that refers to a scoundrel or a mean fellow. Our word of the day’s origin is unknown, but we know it’s not a word you’d ever want to be called. It’s a synonym of such unfriendly words as rascal, charlatan and reprobate. Here’s an example: I’ve been called a scroyle for this, but I really don’t like people making too much noise nea…
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