Scientists відкриті
[search 0]
більше

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Are you searching for great stories to ignite your curiosity, teach you to perform better in life and career, inspire your mind, and make you laugh along the way? In this science podcast, Dr. Marie McNeely introduces you to the brilliant researchers behind the latest scientific discoveries. Join us as they share their greatest failures, most staggering successes, candid career advice, and what drives them forward in life and science. Our website with show notes]] Greetings science fans! We’r ...
 
Scientists talk about what they do and why they do what they do. Their motivations, their trajectory, their setbacks, their achievements. They offer their personal take on science, mentoring and the many aspects that have shaped their work and their lives. Hosted by journalist Vivien Marx. Her work has appeared in Nature journals, Science, The Economist, The NY Times, The Wall Street Journal Europe and New Scientist among others. (Art: Justin Jackson)
 
“Share your science” is a new story collection from scientists at the NASA Ames Research Center. The Ames Science Directorate comprises of researchers from the Earth, Space, and Biosciences Divisions. We are sharing this collection to showcase the breadth of fascinating research and to capture personal stories, challenges, discussions about diversity, science communication, and special moments scientists would like to share along their journey. Our aim is to foster a welcoming space and insp ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
Scientists and doctors are always after good quality human cells for research and therapeutic purposes, but these can be hard to come by in sufficient quantities. Now, synthetic biology company bit.bio has opened up new headquarters in Cambridge to start supplying multiple different cell types by reprogramming stem cells. Eva Higginbotham heard mor…
 
Our understanding of what causes multiple sclerosis (MS) has transformed over the last few decades. While discoveries of the cell types involved in MS progression — both immune and brain — have led to major advancements for patients, there is still much to learn. Co-host Danielle Mandikian speaks to Ann Herman, Senior Director and Senior Principal …
 
In recognition of World Sepsis Day on the 13th, we're unpicking the science of this dangerous syndrome - from the infections that cause it, to the genes that make us more susceptible, and how artificial intelligence can help us to crack it... Plus, in the news, sending hydrogen to houses through the gas network to cut our carbon footprint. How a hi…
 
Many of us love putting out bird seed and watching birds feast away, and feel we're doing a good deed too, but a new paper out of Manchester Metropolitan University suggests we may actually be doing more harm than good. Eva Higginbotham spoke to BBC science correspondent Victoria Gill, who spoke with lead author Alex Lees previously... Like this po…
 
Im Gespräch mit Prof. Ernst Ulrich von Weizsäcker Der Weg hin zu einer nachhaltigen Welt stellt die Menschheit vor eine fundamentale Aufgabe, deren Lösung das Mitwirken aller Teile der Gesellschaft verlangt. Dies bedeutet die Kooperation verschiedener Handlungsebenen und -felder: von der Wissenschaft über zivilgesellschaftliche Organisationen und z…
 
Dr. Jennifer Grandis is a Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Director of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute, and Associate Vice Chancellor of Clinical and Translational Research at the University of California, San Francisco. She is also an American Cancer Society Professor. Jennifer is a Cancer Bio…
 
Listener Mark was curious to know: "Since the Universe is expanding, and light coming across it stretches as it does so, becoming more red, what happens to the lost energy when the shorter wavelength, higher energy light towards the blue end of the spectrum is shifted into lower energy, red wavelengths?" Cameron Voisey went off to figure it out... …
 
The gap between rich and poor is getting ever wider. Or is it? And should the creation of wealth be guided by the articulation of a societal purpose, or should the so called market be allowed to flourish, unfettered? Sir John Kay and Ahmed Zaidi discuss wealth creation... Like this podcast? Please help us by writing a review…
 
What causes r-rolling difficulties otherwise known as rhotacism? Also, why do we have to stay still in an MRI scanner, why is calcium a metal, what makes water hard and how does a water softener work, what is the impact of a caesarian birth on health and why, what's the reason dementia affects short but not long term memory, and how does gravity wo…
 
Most schools across the UK are open and children are heading back to their classrooms. But to what extent will this affect the Covid case rates across the country and what can we do to avoid disrupting a third academic year? In Scotland, children returned to school sooner than their English counterparts: what can we learn from their experience? Chr…
 
Chris Berrow and Leigh Milner have moved house and are recording in their new dusty living room! In this episode, why video games companies keep re-releasing old games rather than focusing their attention on new ones. And Riley Constantine tells us how character creation in games made her realise a few things about herself. Also Netflix makes a for…
 
Jana and Jordan host their second ever livestream for Give 8/28, a fundraiser hosted by the Young, Black, & Giving Back Institute! They are joined by the amazing scientists, Dr. Shenell Tolson and Chad Singleton, M.P.H. who share their experiences as black scientists and members of B-SCI, all while encouraging you to B-Scientists! Head to give828.o…
 
This episode was funded by listeners like you. For more details on how to help support our podcast and gain access to exclusive content, please see our Patreon page. Show Notes: In this bite-size research episode, Megan discusses research on delayed vs. immediate feedback in the classroom. Like with many effective learning strategies, what students…
 
Quite soon after the pandemic first struck a significant number of people began to complain of persistent symptoms in the aftermath of being infected with the new coronavirus. These manifestations have been dubbed "long covid". What's less clear is the extent to which this is happening not just to adults but also to children, and particularly teena…
 
This week, we are boosting our knowledge on what "immunity" against COVID-19 really means and what our strategy heading into winter should be. We'll also hear about a new generation of coronavirus vaccines to better protect us in future. Plus, in the news, signs that living through the pandemic is having a serious impact on early childhood developm…
 
We often look for water on remote planets and moons because, as far as we know, it's a requirement for life. Now a team of researchers using the Hubble Space Telescope to scrutinise Jupiter's largest moon, Ganymede, think they've found water in its atmosphere. Sally Le Page spoke with team member Kurt Retherford. Like this podcast? Please help us b…
 
Loading …

Короткий довідник

Google login Twitter login Classic login