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Wisdom is the next step in gaining knowledge. And with that, the Native Learning Center has created the Hoporenkv Native American Podcast. Hoporenkv (Hopo-thlee-in-ka) is the Creek word for “wisdom”. Hoporenkv Native American Podcast is the audio podcast from the Seminole Tribe of Florida’s Native Learning Center to provide short and focused information on various Tribal housing and community development topics and subject matter related to Tribal housing and NAHASDA in shorter formats than ...
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The presented readings are featured with permission from Pastor Terry Wildman. Pastor Wildman is passionate about sharing the Gospel with Native Americans, in a culturally relevant way. Learn more about his vision at rainsongmusic.net and firstnationsversion.com. Native American Ministries Sunday (NAMS) reminds us of the contributions made by Native Americans to our society. Our generosity supports Native American outreach within annual conferences and across the United States and provides s ...
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Native Opinion an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Incorporated

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Native Opinion is a unique Indigenous culture education Radio show & podcast from an American Indian perspective on current affairs. The Hosts of this show are Michael Kickingbear, an enrolled member of the Mashantucket Pequot tribal nation of Connecticut and David GreyOwl, of the Echoda Eastern Band of Cherokee nation of Alabama. Together they present Indigenous views on American history, politics, the environment, and culture. This show is open to all people, and its main focus is to provi ...
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All around the country, many Native families are not whole. Whether their loved one is missing or murdered, many questions remain unanswered. This podcast will review several cases in the Northwestern region of the country, speak to family members of these victims, and examine some other factors that affect this ongoing problem.
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The Native American Flute Music podcast is hosted by Bill Webb. Bill Webb is a composer, performer and singer of original music featuring Native American flute and world instruments. The Native American Flute Podcast includes music from dozens of his published albums from the first release, 'Native American Flute' in 2003 to 'Medicine' released in 2017. New albums will be played on the weekly podcasts as they are released along with the many previous albums. Native American Flute guest artis ...
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History podcasts of Mexico, Latina, Latino, Hispanic, Chicana, Chicano, Mexicana, Mexicano, genealogy, mexico, mexican, mexicana, mexicano, mejico, mejicana, mejicano, hispano, hispanic, hispana, latino, latina, latin, america, espanol, espanola, spanish, indigenous, indian, indio, india, native, native american, chicano, chicana, mesoamerican, mesoamerica, raza, podcast, podcasting, nuestra, familia, or unida are welcome here. If it has to do with the history of America, California, Oregon, ...
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This podcast was developed as part of an elementary-level Clark County School District Teaching American History Grant. The three-year grant will fund six modules per year with each module focusing on a different era of American history and a different pedagogical theme. This podcast focuses on Native Americans of the Colonial Era and Technology Integration in Elementary Schools. Participants in the grant are third, fourth, and fifth grade teachers in Clark County (the greater Las Vegas area ...
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In his book, Native Southerners: Indigenous History from Origins to Removal(University of Oklahoma Press, 2019), Dr. Gregory D. Smithers effectively articulates the complex history of Native Southerners. Smithers conveys the history of Native Southerners through numerous historical eras while properly reinterpreting popular misconceptions about the…
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Stories of Our Living Ephemera: Storytelling Methodologies in the Archives of the Cherokee National Seminaries, 1846-1907 (Utah State University Press, 2023) recovers the history of the Cherokee National Seminaries from scattered archives and colonized research practices by critically weaving together pedagogy and archival artifacts with Cherokee t…
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For western colonists in the early American backcountry, disputes often ended in bloodshed and death. Making the Frontier Man: Violence, White Manhood, and Authority in the Early Western Backcountry (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2023) by Dr. Matthew C. Ward examines early life and the origins of lawless behaviour in Pennsylvania, Virginia, Kentu…
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In Properties of Empire: Indians, Colonists, and Land Speculators on the New England Frontier (NYU Press, 2019), Ian Saxine, Visiting Assistant Professor of History at Bridgewater State University, shows the dynamic relationship between Native and English systems of property on the turbulent edge of Britain’s empire, and how so many colonists came …
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Today’s book is: Whiskey Tender: A Memoir (Harper, 2024), by Deborah Jackson Taffa, who was raised to believe that some sacrifices were necessary to achieve a better life. Her grandparents—citizens of the Quechan (Yuma) Nation and Laguna Pueblo tribe—were sent to Indian boarding schools run by white missionaries, while her parents were encouraged t…
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“Is America an Empire?” is a popular question for pundits and historians, likely because it sets off such a provocative debate. All too often, however, people use empire simply because the United States is a hegemon, ignoring the country’s imperial traits to focus simply on its power. Dr. Daniel Immerwahr’s book How to Hide an Empire: The History o…
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A gripping account of the violence and turmoil that engulfed England’s fledgling colonies and the crucial role played by Native Americans in determining the future of North America. In 1675, eastern North America descended into chaos. Virginia exploded into civil war, as rebel colonists decried the corruption of planter oligarchs and massacred alli…
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Cynthia Sylvester's The Half-White Album (University of New Mexico Press 2023) is a collection of stories, flash fiction, and poems revolving around the journey of a travelling band, The Covers. The stories are songs on the album, beginning with “Live at the House of Towers,” about a woman’s memories of her mother and home. The story of Shima (and …
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Food is at the center of everything, writes University of Washington professor of American Indian Studies Charlotte Coté. In A Drum in One Hand, A Sockeye in the Other: Stories of Indigenous Food Sovereignty from the Northwest Coast (U Washington Press, 2022), Coté shares stories from her own experience growing up and living in the Pacific Northwes…
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In Amazonian Cosmopolitans: Navigating a Shamanic Cosmos, Shifting Indigenous Policies, and Other Modern Projects (U Nebraska Press, 2022), Suzanne Oakdale focuses on the autobiographical accounts of two Brazilian Indigenous leaders, Prepori and Sabino, Kawaiwete men whose lives spanned the twentieth century, when Amazonia increasingly became the c…
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In Reckoning with Restorative Justice Hawaii Women's Prison Writing (Duke University Press, 2023), Dr. Leanne Trapedo Sims explores the experiences of women incarcerated at the Women’s Community Correctional Center, the only women’s prison in Hawaii. Adopting a decolonial and pro-abolitionist lens, she focuses mainly on women’s participation in the…
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Scott Gac's Born in Blood: Violence and the Making of America (Cambridge UP, 2023) investigates one of history's most violent undertakings: The United States of America. People the world over consider violence in the United States as measurably different than that which troubles the rest of the globe, citing reasons including gun culture, the Ameri…
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Release Date: 01.17.2024 Hoporenkv Native American Podcast: “A Day in the Life of a Resident Services Department” Special Guests: • Christine De Los Santos, Resident Services Manager Northern Circle Indian Housing Authority • Montana Wise, Resident Services Specialist Northern Circle Indian Housing Authority • Maddi Ferranti, Resident Services Spec…
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By putting the Midwest at the center of Vast Early America, University of Illinois historian Robert Morrissey reconfigures the power dynamics in the story of North America during the era of colonialism. In his award-winning People of the Ecotone: Environment and Indigenous Power at the Center of Early America (U Washington Press, 2022), Morrissey t…
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In The Tame and the Wild: People and Animals after 1492 (Harvard University Press, 2024), Dr. Marcy Norton offers a dramatic new interpretation of the encounter between Europe and the Americas that reveals the crucial role of animals in the shaping of the modern world. When the men and women of the island of Guanahani first made contact with Christ…
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Paul Radin was one of the founding generation of American cultural anthropologists: A student of Franz Boas, and famed ethnographer of the Winnebago. Yet little is known about Radin's life. A leftist who was persecuted by the FBI and who lived for several years outside of the United States, and a bohemian who couldn't keep an academic job, there ar…
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Release Date: 01.03.2024 Hoporenkv Native American Podcast: “An Update on the Exciting Things Happening with the Youth Police Initiative” Special Guests: Jay Paris Director of Prevention & Early Prevention Programs North American Family Institute Special Projects Youth Police Initiative Julie Barrot De Brito Director of Operations Youth Police Init…
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In 1570's New Kingdom of Granada (modern Colombia), a new generation of mestizo (half-Spanish, half-indigenous) men sought positions of increasing power in the colony's two largest cities. In response, Spanish nativist factions zealously attacked them as unequal and unqualified, unleashing an intense political battle that lasted almost two decades.…
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Laura Briggs’s Taking Children: A History of American Terror (University of California Press 2020) is a forceful and captivating book that readers won’t be able to put down, and that listeners from all sort of backgrounds will definitely want to hear more about. Weaving together histories of Black communities (in the US and the Americas more broadl…
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How did Native Americans make war, not with European settlers, but amongst themselves? Historian Wayne E. Lee, a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, explores this often-neglected question in his book, The Cutting-Off Way: Indigenous Warfare in Eastern North America, 1500-1800 (The University of North Carolina Press, 2023).…
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Release Date: 12.20.2023 Hoporenkv Native American Podcast: “Priority Telecommunication Services for Indian Country: How CISA Emphasizes Protecting Your Communities” Special Guests: • Larry Clutts, Priority Telecommunications Services Area Representative (PAR) for the Department of Homeland Security, Office of Emergency Communications, for FEMA Reg…
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Health in the Highlands: Indigenous Healing and Scientific Medicine in Guatemala and Ecuador (University of California Press, 2023) explores how, in the early to mid-twentieth century, the governments of Ecuador and Guatemala sought to expand Western medicine within their countries, with the goals of addressing endemic diseases and improving infant…
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What if racism shared an origin with opposition to racism? What if the condemnation of injustice gave rise both to an early form of anti-racism and to the racial hierarchies that haunt the modern era? Rolena Adornol, David Orique, María Cristina Ríos Espinosa tell the story of how Bartolomé de las Casas, a Dominican missionary to New Spain, came to…
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What do Tulsa, Santa Fe, and New Orleans have in common? When viewed from the perspective of Indigenous arts and culture, the answer is quite a bit. In Urban Homelands: Writing the Native City from Oklahoma (U Nebraska, 2023), Oklahoma State University professor of English Lindsey Claire Smith draws connections between Indigenous art, particularly …
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In The Ends of Research: Indigenous and Settler Science after the War in the Woods (Duke University Press, 2023) by Dr. Tom Özden-Schilling explores the afterlives of several research initiatives that emerged in the wake of the “War in the Woods,” a period of anti-logging blockades in Canada in the late twentieth century. Drawing on ethnographic fi…
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What is the “traditional American family?” Popular images from the colonial and pioneer past suggest an isolated and self-sufficient nuclear family as the center of American identity and the source of American strength. But the idea of early American self-sufficiency is a myth. Caro Pirri tells the story of the precarious Jamestown settlement and h…
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Hoporenkv Native American Podcast: “How to Avoid Scams and Stay Safe Online” Guest Speaker: Alvaro Puig, Consumer Education Specialist Division of Consumer and Business Education Federal Trade Commission Episode Description: We hear about various online scams going around, but we don’t often look into the dangers of them until the scamming happens …
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Hoporenkv Native American Podcast: “Young Native Leaders on Climate Change” Guests: Seminole Tribe of Florida H.E.R.O.: Krystle Bowers (Seminole Tribe of Florida)Cody Motlow (Seminole Tribe of Florida)Featuring: Billie Cypress (Seminole Tribe of Florida)Durante Blais-Billie (Seminole Tribe of Florida)Helesi Two Shoes (Seminole Tribe of Florida)Epis…
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American Visions: The United States, 1800-1860 (Norton, 2023) is a revealing history of the formative period when voices of dissent and innovation defied power and created visions of America still resonant today. With so many of our histories falling into dour critique or blatant celebration, here is a welcome departure: a book that offers hope as …
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Guest Speaker: William Latchford, President Native Peacekeeper Consulting Group Co-Director FSU College of Criminology & Criminal Justice Native American Crime and Justice Research & Policy Institute Episode Description: Since we are moving full steam ahead into the Holiday Season, we sat down with William Latchford, President of the Native Peaceke…
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Understanding and Teaching Native American History (University of Wisconsin Press, 2023), co-edited by Kristofer Ray and Brady DeSanti, is a timely and urgently needed remedy to a long-standing gap in history instruction. While the past three decades have seen burgeoning scholarship in Indigenous studies, comparatively little of that has trickled i…
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Accounts of decolonization routinely neglect Indigenous societies in North America and Australasia, yet Native communities have made unique contributions to anticolonial thought and activism. David Myer Temin's book Remapping Sovereignty: Decolonization and Self-Determination in North American Indigenous Political Thought (U Chicago Press, 2023) ex…
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An ethnographic study based on decades of field research, Pilgrimage to Broken Mountain: Nahua Sacred Journeys in Mexico's Huasteca Veracruzana (UP of Colorado, 2023) explores five sacred journeys to the peaks of venerated mountains undertaken by Nahua people living in northern Veracruz, Mexico. Punctuated with elaborate ritual offerings dedicated …
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Link(s) to Include with Episode: https://visionaryventuresnfp.com/ https://www.cbsnews.com/chicago/news/affordable-housing-native-americans-irving-park/ https://chicagoyimby.com/2023/08/affordable-development-proposed-for-2907-w-irving-park-road-in-irving-park.html https://blockclubchicago.org/2021/12/10/irving-park-will-be-home-to-the-citys-first-…
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The story of the British Empire is a familiar one: Britain came, it saw, it conquered, forging a glorious world empire upon which the sun never set. In fact, far from being the tale of a single nation imposing its will upon the world, the expanding British Empire frequently found itself frustrated by the power and tenacious resistance of the Indige…
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Guest Speaker: William Latchford, President Native Peacekeeper Consulting Group Co-Director FSU College of Criminology & Criminal Justice Native American Crime and Justice Research & Policy Institute William R. Latchford President Native Peacekeeper Consulting Group, LLC. A Native Woman-Owned Public Safety Consulting Firm Retired Executive Director…
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In this interview James Fenelon discusses his new book entitled Indian, Black and Irish: Indigenous Nations, African Peoples, European Invasions, 1492-1790, recently published with Routledge (2023). The book traces 500 years of European-American colonization and racialized dominance, expanding our common assumptions about the ways racialization was…
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Episode Description: Listen in this week to the Hoporenkv Native American Podcast as our hosts learn about a new home financing program that was developed by Freddie Mac specifically for Native Americans: HeritageOne. Catherine Houlihan, Manager of Single-Family Specialized Loan Products at Freddie Mac, connects with Ouista Atkins and Brooke Warrin…
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In this episode of Native Opinion, we do a deep dive into the fires which eliminated the town of Lahaina, in Maui, Hawaii. From the loss of life, to greedy venture capitalists looking to acquire more land from the Kanaka Hawaiian people who have already lost so much. We also look at the politics involved, and try to bring a perspective that was nev…
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The conquest of Indigenous land in the eastern United States through corrupt treaties and genocidal violence laid the groundwork for the conquest of the American West. In Gallop Toward the Sun: Tecumseh and William Henry Harrison's Struggle for the Destiny of a Nation (Random House, 2023), acclaimed author Peter Stark exposes the fundamental confli…
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Historian Alejandra Dubcovsky tells a story of war, slavery, loss, remembrance, and the women whose resilience and resistance transformed the colonial South. In exploring their lives she rewrites early American history, challenging the established male-centered narrative. In Talking Back: Native Women and the Making of the Early South (Yale UP, 202…
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Today’s book is Indigenous DC: Native Peoples and the Nation’s First Capital (Georgetown UP, 2023), by Dr. Elizabeth Rule, which is the first and fullest account of the suppressed history and continuing presence of Native Americans in Washington, DC. Washington, DC, is Indian land, but Indigenous peoples are often left out of the national narrative…
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In honor of World Mental Health Day, the Hoporenkv Native American Podcast is putting out a special episode featuring Priest Martinez, Chair and Co-Founder of Mending Indigenous Spirits as well as Empowerment and Supportive Services Manager of Northern Circle Indian Housing Authority. Priest joins Ouista Atkins and Brooke Warrington, the Training a…
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The Republic Will Be Kept Clean: How Settler Colonial Violence Shaped Antileft Repression (University of Illinois Press, 2023) by Dr. Tariq D. Khan examines the long relationship between America’s colonising wars and virulent anticommunism. The colonising wars against Native Americans created the template for anticommunist repression in the United …
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Join us this week as we connect with Jill Horwitz, Krystle Young Bowers, and Cody Motlow of the Seminole Tribe of Florida’s Heritage and Environmental Resources Office (aka H.E.R.O.). These ladies have a passion for protecting the environment that leaps right off the recording! Better yet, they share their wisdom with our hosts on how all of us liv…
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Today’s book is A Calm and Normal Heart: Stories (The Unnamed Press, 2022) by Chelsea T. Hicks. The heroes of A Calm and Normal Heart are modern-day adventurers—seeking out new places to call their own inside a nation to which they do not entirely belong. A member of the Osage tribe, Hicks’ stories are compelled by an overlooked diaspora happening …
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Today’s guest is Edgar Garcia. Garcia’s new book Emergency: Reading the Popol Vuh in a Time of Crisis (University of Chicago Press, 2022). Emergency takes nine words—“birds,” “wealth,” “caves,” “television,” “demons,” “migrations,” “love,” “the sun,” and “Mormons”—and weaves a rich transhistorical narrative about the Popul Vuh sacred narrative. In …
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Bookshop.org is an online book retailer that donates more than 80% of its profits to independent bookstores. Launched in 2020, Bookshop.org has already raised more than $27,000,000. In this interview, Andy Hunter, founder and CEO discusses his journey to creating one of the most revolutionary new organizations in the book world. Bookshop has found …
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Guest Speaker: Rolando Jaimez (Pascua Yaqui) Deputy Director of Housing Pascua Yaqui Tribe Division Episode Description: Are you currently planning or plan to further develop the housing for your Tribe in Indian Country? Rolando Jaimez (Pascua Yaqui), Deputy Director of Housing Pascua Yaqui Tribe, sits down with Ouista Atkins and Brooke Warrington,…
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