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Racism has re-created the world in Black and white, with Black inscribed as perpetually dangerous and white as the goal of progress and civilization. Colorism is how this plays out within categories of race and ethnic communities, darker skin associated with the qualities ascribed to Blackness and people with lighter skin seen as more credible, mor…
 
Racism re-created the world as Black and White, with Black at the bottom of the social hierarchy and white at the top. Others were added to the spaces between with darker skin associated with Blackness, even within communities seen as white. This conversation with Erica Williams and Amber Starks unpacks the ways in which we have internalized coloni…
 
Borders are more than the lines between countries. States like Canada, the US, Australia, and Europe increasingly push their borders into other countries, tying foreign aid to agreements for preventing migrants from even getting to our borders. And the violence that creates is hidden from view. This conversation with Harsha Walia is difficult and l…
 
Our conversation with Dr. Tope Adefarakan continues with a deeper look at Yoruba traditions and what it means to be Indigenous as Black and Native peoples. Building from WEB DuBois' book "The Souls of Black Folk" we talk about the duality that Indigenous peoples live within, engaging and challenging the dominant world.…
 
Dr. Tope Adefarakan joins us to talk about her research into the Yoruba belief system, how it came to the Americas with enslaved people, and it's various adaptations in this new world. The pockets of belief that persist despite centuries of attempted erasure and how these beliefs enable organization and activism.…
 
A politics of refusal turns it’s back on patriarchy and just goes on building something new, something different, something closer to what we had before. A politics of refusal does not seek inclusion because if what are we seeking inclusion into? The people on this panel have all refused: refused to let Patriarchy define the boundaries or decide wh…
 
What are the conditions that our communities need to see the Milky Way? To notice badgers and raccoons? To gather moss? To watch the growth of plants and their relationships to each other? To be undrowned. This month authors Daniel Heath Justice (Badger and Raccoon) and Chanda Prescod-Weinstein (Disordered Cosmos) join Ben Krawec, Celeste Smith, an…
 
In this episode, recorded in February 2021, we talk with James about a mutual aid project in the Lakota lands of the Black Hills. There is a tension in finding ways to house and care for our own in the midst of colonial rules about place.Medicine for the Resistance
 
Our guest tells us, "as a storyteller you have a responsibility not to change the story but to show your audience a different way of seeing it, seeing it from a different perspective,." Storytelling helps us to see and understand ourselves and our place in the world a little bit better. They help us to locate ourselves not only in the past and pres…
 
Dr. Keri Leigh Merritt joins us again to talk about her book, Reconsidering Southern Labour: Race, Class, and Power. We touch on the rise of policing as a way of controlling the newly freed Black population and the way that labour was at times complicit and at times a source of liberation, but almost always in conflict with the state. https://upf.c…
 
"Early on for colonists, raccoons become a really malleable and iconic species in terms of their appearance. And they are pretty abundant, so an easily mobilized symbol of America in the colonial imagination. But as time goes on they lose status, and as they lose status an animal that symbolism gets transferred. " Daniel Heath Justice talking about…
 
Dr. Marshall returns in the days after the insurrection of January 6 to talk with us about the Reconstruction and Gilded Age in the US. That was a period of transformation when the US had to decide if it would reconcile with white plantation owners who committed treason, or if it would reckon with the realities of slavery and dispossession. The US …
 
Enestine Hayes (The Tao of Raven, Blonde Indian), Kaitln Curtice (Native, Glory Happening), Demita Frazier (interviewed for How We Get Free), Jenessa Galenkamp, and Joy Henderson join host Patty Krawec to talk about memoirs, who we write them for, why we write them, and the connections that they create.…
 
Dr. Lindsay Marshall is a historian of the American west and she joins us to talk about how history is not just filled with gaps, it's simply wrong. The things we learn about history create a public memory and that matters. The way that we remember things matter because that's what shapes how we react to social needs and problems how we shape polic…
 
Our history is the future. We look at history for clues to what is happening today and this conversation with Nick Estes, Tiya Miles, Cheryl Savageau, Sean Carson, and Khadija Hammuda dives into the intersections of Black and Indigenous history. The ways we are and are not visible in each others stories.More information at daanis.ca/ambe…
 
This month features the book Why Indigenous Literatures Matter by Daniel Heath Justice. Daniel and Patty are joined by poet Janet Marie Rogers, educators Joy Henderson, Robin McBurney, and Ishkenekeya and my artist Neil Ellis Orts. Indigenous literatures teach us how to be human. How to be good relatives. How to be good ancestors. How to live toget…
 
For part two of our discussion about abolition we are joined by the members of the Free Land Free People collective. This Edmonton based advocacy group supports prisoners in a variety of ways including fundraising to help inmates with the costs of being imprisoned and becoming free. On the road to abolition, prisoners need support.…
 
Human Rights lawyer Anthony Morgan joins us again, this time to talk about abolishing police. Policing has a long history of disproportionately targeting and incarcerating Black and Indigenous people. More than that, the systems we live in push us to the edges where options are limited and the resulting criminality becomes part of a cycle that is i…
 
Briana l. Ureña Ravelo joins us again on the eve of the US election to talk about refusal to engage with electoral politics. How much does voting really change things, and what happens next. All that energy that went into getting out the vote, what happens next? For most people? Nothing. Electoral politics is the beginning and end of their engageme…
 
We're all familiar with the Tulsa Race Riots, but there is a story that we are unfamiliar with. The history of the people who formed that neighbourhood. The Freedmen who came, as slaves, with the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Seminole, and Osage and who also received land allotments in Oklahoma. This is the story of Tulsa. Which is the story of the…
 
This episode was recorded on Thursday October 22 and begins with an update from journalist Karl Dockstader, friend of the podcast and co-host of One Dish One Mic on the iheart radio network. Karl has been providing on the ground coverage of the action at 1492 Landback Lane and you can find more information on that here: https://ca.gofundme.com/f/le…
 
Inside and outside the church we all have ideas about purity that drive our decisions and relationships. People are too radical, not radical enough. Their beliefs or goals don't align perfectly with ours. Our lives become more defined by what we don't do, where we can't shop, what we won't eat all in a quest for purity that we will never achieve. S…
 
The arts have always functioned as a means of resistance, a way of pushing back against established authority or traditions, challenging us to think and act in new ways. Janet Marie Rogers is a Mohawk poet currently living at the Six Nations Reserve outside Brantford Ontario. She is a writer and artist, the author of poetry including her most recen…
 
In this episode we talk with Dr. Sarah Taber of the Farm to Taber podcast. She has worked in and studied trends in farming and agriculture across the US.transcript available here: http://daanis.ca/2020/09/28/the-truth-about-big-ag-with-dr-sarah-taber/Medicine for the Resistance
 
Robyn Maynard, author of Policing Black Lives, joins us for a conversation about policing. People are not just marginalize, they are pushed violently to the margins and policing is one way that this is done. With the release of prisoners because of the risk of Covid-19 in prisons, we are seeing a glimpse of what is possible. That we can truly imagi…
 
The idea of defunding the police is gaining traction, and it may feel more possible than abolition, but Black and Indigenous people have been doing the impossible for centuries. Abolition is possible. Desmond Cole tells us why it is necessary. Transcript is available at http://www.daanis.ca under the blogs tab…
 
For many Black and Indigenous people growing up feels unmoored, isolated, lonely. Like Tammy Street said a few weeks earler, we grew up in a blizzard of whiteness. Which makes going home so powerful. To see yourself reflected everywhere. To see yourself in positions of authority and service, to see yourself everywhere and reflected in everyone. To …
 
Marina Nabao joins us again for a conversation about how we move through the world as women, Black and Indigenous. It was recorded in March, before the pandemic when the Canadian government was in a standoff against Indigenous activists blockading trains and ports. We talk about the need for change and healing, a badly needed reset for this western…
 
Azie Dungey joins us to talk about growing up in three worlds, Black, Indigenous, and America. Azie's family is connected to the Pawmunkey tribe in Virginia, recently recognized by the US government despite 400 years of documented contact and relationship. Solidarity between Black and Indigenous people is complicated and transformative. Transcript …
 
We are deeply invested in our identities, but how do we even begin to understand who we are outside of the colonial context? Black and Indigenous identities are largely constructed by the colonial regime, as are sexual identities. We are framed against the white, cis het normal. We imagine people as either civilized or uncivilized based on how clos…
 
Food is about connection, about family and community. We all know this. But it is also about relationship to land and place. It contains language and history as well as a way forward. Find one native plant, one thing in your backyard or the place you live. Learn everything about it. Tend it. Take care of it, and be taken care of in return. transcri…
 
Everybody says that they are "not racist" but the truth is that we are all raised in a settler-colonial world that attributes qualities to people based on their race and then puts those qualities into a hierarchy. This is my attempt at helping a group of emerging podcasters to identify and then challenge racist beliefs and ideas. The presentation i…
 
Tammy Street is an artist, a mother, and a mystery. She was adopted and knows little about her birth family except that her mother was not white. She describes being raised "in a blizzard" and the impact of seeing the works of Indigenous artists reflecting her own appearance. While not claiming to be Indigenous, Tammy is trying to be a good relativ…
 
Social worker, activist, and community member Verlia Roberts joins us again to talk about what community means during a pandemic. How do we make sure that nobody gets left behind while making sure that we don't become overwhelmed. What we do now matters.Medicine for the Resistance
 
It's Indigenous art if Indigenous artists make it. Olivia Shortt joins us to talk about her project with Face the Music and the Jack Quartet in New York City, creating Indigenous space in a new environment. She talks about the impact that the quarantine has had one her work, and how it has made her think about creative ways to accomplish her goals.…
 
Colonialism is a total regime, it is not a system or a way of thinking. It is a regime that articulates itself differently on different bodies but it has the same goal. The subjugation of those at the edges. Dr. Tamari Kitossa joins us to talk about the construction of the Black male, about criminology as a tool of colonialism, and how patriarchy i…
 
What does it mean to complete a PhD without citing any white men? Is it as simple as pulling books off of your bookshelf or is there more to it than that. Of course there is. We are joined with PhD student Hana Burgess and, drawing on the work of Sara Ahmed, we talk about expanding our ideas of relationality. How do we live as good relatives moving…
 
Dr. Kim Tallbear joins us again to talk about the structure of racism and how our actions and thoughts either support or dismantle the settler/colonial project. The conversation references the work of Dr. Ibram X Kendi and his books Stamped from the Beginning and How to Be Anti-Racist. Links to the interviews we reference are below.Whiteness has al…
 
Every September in Canada we recognize Orange Shirt Day, a day set aside to consider the impact that residential schools had on Indigenous communities and we talk about the victims. But what about those who ran the schools? Who worked there? And what about the contemporary systems that we find ourselves in as both victims and workers. Well first yo…
 
World Literature Professor and Romance Novelist Piper Huguley joins us again to talk books. We talk Shakespeare, Ibsen, dePIzon, and Federici. We talk about the ways in which books can open us up to new ideas and ways of thinking about things, and how far back the roots of feminism really go. And I suggest a book project for somebody if they want t…
 
Angela Gray joins us again to talk about becoming Black. She was adopted by a white family and grew up outside Toronto in a largely white community, later moving to Vancouver as an adult. Angela talks about learning to see herself as a Black woman and what that meant for her, and her anticipation of going home to Jamaica. Transcript available here:…
 
When people with one way of seeing the world encounter another group, they can't make sense of what they are seeing because it doesn't fit into their narrative, so what they see becomes altered to fit their ideas of how the world works.Although there have always been historians and archeologists who have challenged these stereotypes, alternative vi…
 
What are you doing to impact the world? A homework question launched Aisha Francis into interrogating her own life, what was present and what was missing in order to support the families impacted by the incarceration of one of their own. From the structural racism that results in the unreasonable numbers of BIPOC In jails, to disrupted grief, to wh…
 
Living in diaspora is hard, Black, Jewish, and Indigenous people find themselves living far from the land that made them. For how many generations can we continue to hold onto our identity before we become somebody who was descended from .. somebody with an approved ethnic identity that no longer challenges the state. Preserving that so that our ch…
 
Piper Hughley is a professor and romance novelist, centering the voices of women who have been erased or ignored in her classroom and her novels. Long seen as a field of writing that doesn't need to be taken seriously, Piper sees centering the stories of Black men and women in historical romance as a subversive act. And she spills some tea about WE…
 
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