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The Lauterpacht Centre for International Law is the scholarly home of International law at the University of Cambridge. The Centre, founded by Sir Elihu Lauterpacht QC in 1983, serves as a forum for the discussion and development of international law and is one of the specialist law centres of the Faculty of Law. The Centre holds weekly lectures on topical issues of international law by leading practitioners and academics. For more information see the LCIL website at http://www.lcil.cam.ac.uk/
 
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show series
 
Lecture summary: The Geneva Conventions were adopted more than 70 years ago. How has their interpretation evolved over time? This lecture will look at the application of the rules on treaty interpretation to ‘older’ treaties, such as the 1949 Geneva Conventions. It draws upon the experience the speaker has gained in updating the commentaries on the…
 
A lecture delivered by Professor René Provost, McGill University at the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law (LCIL) on 29 April 2022.Several hundred European ISIS fighters, reportedly including nine British men and fifteen British women, have been held without trial by Syrian Kurdish forces for several years. The UK, like many European governme…
 
Friday, 18 March 2022 - 2.00pmLocation: Online webinarThis online event will be held from 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm.This event, divided into two panels, showcases recent scholarship in international criminal law and international humanitarian law. Transcending disciplinary boundaries and theoretical traditions whilst harnessing extensive archival research…
 
Dr Christina Voigt is Professor of Law at the University of Oslo, Norway. She is an internationally renowned expert in international environmental law and teaches, speaks and publishes widely on legal issues of climate change, environmental multilateralism and sustainability.From 2009-2018, she worked as principal legal adviser for the Government o…
 
The Lauterpacht Centre for International Law (LCIL) and the Centre for European Legal Studies (CELS) held an online Rapid Response Seminar on the War in Ukraine on 7 March 2022.On the 24 February 2022 Russian troops launched a fully-fledged invasion of Ukraine after force had been used between the two countries in February 2014 with the annexing of…
 
Lecture summary: The history of corporate human rights abuses is much older than the history of international human rights law. The activities of colonial corporations are a case in point. However, the relation between the state and corporations has changed significantly over the years. Unlike colonial corporations deriving their powers from the Ro…
 
Lecture summary: In December 2020, the UK and five partners signed the 'Agile Nations Charter', reflecting its participants commitment to 'a more agile approach to rule-making ... to unlock the potential of innovation.' Around the same time, the World Economic Forum published a toolkit on 'Agile Regulation for the Fourth Industrial Revolution'. The…
 
Lecture summary: The legal regime for deep seabed mining in the international seabed Area is a rare example of the international community joining forces to regulate a potential new industry in the interests of humankind as a whole. As set forth under the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), the international seabed Area a…
 
Lecture summary: As the future of international law has become a growing site of struggle within and between powerful states, debates over the history of international law have become increasingly heated. In this lecture discussing her new book 'International Law and the Politics of History', Anne Orford explores the ideological, political, and mat…
 
Lecture summary: Dissent has a long and controversial history in international adjudication. This lecture excavates a now-forgotten history of debate over dissent, and identifies competing claims regarding dissent’s effect on judicial legitimacy, independence, and legal doctrine. To evaluate these claims, I undertake a comparative study of dissent …
 
Lecture summary: The talk will draw upon my recent report submitted to the UNHRC earlier this year.See: https://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Housing/Pages/CFI_20years_SR_adequate_housing.aspxBalakrishnan Rajagopal is currently a Professor of Law and Development at the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology…
 
Lecture summary: From 1995, when he arrived in Cambridge, to 2014, when he left, Roger O'Keefe witnessed first hand the evolution and expansion of the small, somewhat homespun Research Centre for International Law into the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, one of the world's leading centres for the research, teaching, and discussion of publ…
 
This lecture is part of the Cambridge Arbitration Society (CUArb)/Lauterpacht Centre for International Law lecture series.Cambridge University
 
Lecture summary: This lecture puts forward the conceptual argument that the transformative goals of the Convention for the Elimination of Discrimination Against (CEDAW), which require states to eradicate root causes of injustice, can be made more effective not only through legislation and policy, as commonly argued, but through the judiciary. It hi…
 
Lecture summary: International law is in constant movement, and any proper account of the international legal order needs to place this movement at the centre. “The course of international law needs to be understood if international law is to be understood,” says James Crawford in the opening of his general course at the Hague Academy in 2013. Yet …
 
Lecture summary: In a series of recent decisions related to same-sex relationships, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights has stated that the American Convention on Human Rights does not advance a singular notion or closed conception of family. A 2017 Advisory Opinion from the Inter-American Court also concluded that the American Convention dema…
 
Thursday, 28 October 2021 - 5.45pm Online webinarThis lecture is part of the Cambridge Arbitration Society (CUArb)/Lauterpacht Centre for International Law lecture series.Speakers: Iain Mckenny, Profile Investment & Louis Young, Augusta Ventures Chair: Ibrahim AlturkiCambridge University
 
Lecture summary: International law still struggles with an understanding of an “international community” that has legally cognizable interests distinguishable from those of individual sovereign States. This international community is imagined variously as the collectivity of sovereign states, an abstract concept of all human beings, an internationa…
 
Lecture summary: Globalization has lifted millions out of poverty. Globalization is a weapon the rich use to exploit the poor. Globalization builds bridges across national boundaries. Globalization fuels the populism and great-power competition that is tearing the world apart. When it comes to the politics of free trade and open borders, the camps …
 
Lecture summary: 20 years after the events of 9/11 and as we assess the fall of Afghanistan to the Taliban fundamental questions about the scope, success and future of counter-terrorism need to be asked and answered. What have the last 20 years of a global architecture of counter-terrorism delivered, what have been the costs, and how can those cost…
 
Lecture summary: Dame Sally will explore global governance for health using the two pandemics of COVID 19 and Antimicrobial Resistance as exemplars highlighting the importance of data and innovation.Dame Sally Davies is the 40th Master of Trinity College, Cambridge University, the UK Government’s Special Envoy on AMR and the chair of The Trinity Ch…
 
Cambridge Arbitration Society, CUArb, was established in 2019 as a registered society at the University of Cambridge. The establishment of the society was a response to Cambridge students’ demands to have exposure to the current arbitration scene.The CUArb aims at promoting the study of international commercial and investment arbitration amongst st…
 
This lecture will be based on my recently edited book, The Performance of Africa's International Courts: Using Litigation for Political, Legal, and Social Change, (OUP, 2020). The central claim made in the book is that Africa’s international courts have important impacts that have so far been underemphasized or are entirely ignored in the scholarsh…
 
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