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The Center for Nursing Inquiry oversees the scholarly work of nurses in the Johns Hopkins Health System. Our goal is to build the capacity for nurses to participate in the three forms of inquiry: research, evidence-based practice (EBP), and quality improvement (QI). At the Center for Nursing Inquiry, we offer a variety of educational resources and expert guidance to help nurses engage in meaningful, high-quality scholarly work. We are dedicated to advancing the science of nursing. Stay conne ...
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Delivering health care is high stakes, but we too often don’t protect our attention and let in too many distractions. In this podcast, Liz Harry, Chief Well-Being Officer at Michigan Medicine, argues that we make things harder by enabling systems … Ep. 3 — Lightening the Load: Strategies to Reduce Cognitive Stress in Clinical Practice | Johns Hopki…
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In this episode, the third (and final) in their series on pre-appraised evidence, Nadine Rosenblum and Maddie Whalen discuss how and where to find evidence for your clinical questions. Maddie talks with Nadine about repositories of pre-appraised evidence, focusing on … Episode 57: Repositories of Pre-Appraised Evidence (Part 3) | Johns Hopkins Cent…
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Women who used talc-containing products genitally may be at increased risk for ovarian cancer, but not for breast cancer, a new study finds. Kimmel Cancer Center director William Nelson at Johns Hopkins says this study attempted to eliminate certain biases … Does use of talc containing products increase a woman’s change of cancer? Elizabeth Tracey …
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Has the complexity of our work in health care outpaced our brain’s ability to keep up? Liz Harry, Chief Well-Being Officerat Michigan Medicine, discusses the connection between cognitive load and burnout, and introduces the concept of the attention economy. Dr. … Ep. 2 — Are You Paying Attention?: How We Can Use Our Focus to Reduce Cognitive Load i…
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Most of us know what it feels like when our well-being at work is compromised. But do we know how we got there? Is it just that it’s been a tough week or we didn’t have time for yoga, or … Ep. 1 — No Amount of Kale and Yoga Will Fix This: The Need for a Systems-Change Approach to Workplace Well-Being | Johns Hopkins Office of Well-Being Read More »…
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In this episode, the third (and final) in their series on pre-appraised evidence, Nadine Rosenblum and Maddie Whalen discuss how and where to find evidence for your clinical questions. Maddie talks with Nadine about repositories of pre-appraised evidence, focusing on … Episode 57: Repositories of Pre-Appraised Evidence (Part 3) | Johns Hopkins Cent…
  continue reading
 
In part two of their three-part series, Nadine Rosenblum and Maddie Whalen continue their conversation about pre-appraised evidence. This episode focuses on sources of evidence for your clinical question - Maddie shares information about two well-known sources, Cochrane and JBI.Johns Hopkins Medicine
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In part two of their three-part series, Nadine Rosenblum and Maddie Whalen continue their conversation about pre-appraised evidence. This episode focuses on sources of evidence for your clinical question - Maddie shares information about two well-known sources, Cochrane and JBI.Johns Hopkins Medicine
  continue reading
 
This month’s podcast begins the first of a three-part series on finding evidence for your clinical question. This episode focuses on the definition of pre-appraised, or “filtered” evidence and what types of evidence they are. Nadine Rosenblum, Nursing Inquiry Program … Episode 55: Searching Pre-Appraised Evidence (Part 1) | Johns Hopkins Center for…
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This month’s podcast begins the first of a three-part series on finding evidence for your clinical question. This episode focuses on the definition of pre-appraised, or “filtered” evidence and what types of evidence they are. Nadine Rosenblum, Nursing Inquiry Program … Episode 55: Searching Pre-Appraised Evidence (Part 1) | Johns Hopkins Center for…
  continue reading
 
Women who used talc-containing products genitally may be at increased risk for ovarian cancer, but not for breast cancer, a new study finds. Kimmel Cancer Center director William Nelson at Johns Hopkins says this study attempted to eliminate certain biases … Does use of talc containing products increase a woman’s change of cancer? Elizabeth Tracey …
  continue reading
 
Women who used talc-containing products genitally may be at increased risk for ovarian cancer, but not for breast cancer, a new study finds. Kimmel Cancer Center director William Nelson at Johns Hopkins says this study attempted to eliminate certain biases … Does use of talc containing products increase a woman’s change of cancer? Elizabeth Tracey …
  continue reading
 
Women who used talc-containing products genitally may be at increased risk for ovarian cancer, but not for breast cancer, a new study finds. Kimmel Cancer Center director William Nelson at Johns Hopkins says this study attempted to eliminate certain biases … Does use of talc containing products increase a woman’s change of cancer? Elizabeth Tracey …
  continue reading
 
Women should undergo screening for breast cancer using mammography every two years from age 40 until 74, the most recent United States Preventive Services Task Force recommendations state. Yet now that life expectancies are increasing, should all women observe the … Should all women stop breast cancer screening at 74 years of age? Elizabeth Tracey …
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Women should undergo screening for breast cancer using mammography every two years from age 40 until 74, the most recent United States Preventive Services Task Force recommendations state. Yet now that life expectancies are increasing, should all women observe the … Should all women stop breast cancer screening at 74 years of age? Elizabeth Tracey …
  continue reading
 
Women should undergo screening for breast cancer using mammography every two years from age 40 until 74, the most recent United States Preventive Services Task Force recommendations state. Yet now that life expectancies are increasing, should all women observe the … Should all women stop breast cancer screening at 74 years of age? Elizabeth Tracey …
  continue reading
 
Women should undergo screening for breast cancer using mammography every two years from age 40 until 74, the most recent United States Preventive Services Task Force recommendations state. Yet now that life expectancies are increasing, should all women observe the … Should all women stop breast cancer screening at 74 years of age? Elizabeth Tracey …
  continue reading
 
If you’re a woman between the ages of 40 and 70, you should undergo screening mammography for breast cancer every two years, the United States Preventive Services Task Force has just recommended. Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center director William Nelson … Screening mammography guidelines have been updated, Elizabeth Tracey reports Read More »…
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If you’re a woman between the ages of 40 and 70, you should undergo screening mammography for breast cancer every two years, the United States Preventive Services Task Force has just recommended. Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center director William Nelson … Screening mammography guidelines have been updated, Elizabeth Tracey reports Read More »…
  continue reading
 
If you’re a woman between the ages of 40 and 70, you should undergo screening mammography for breast cancer every two years, the United States Preventive Services Task Force has just recommended. Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center director William Nelson … Screening mammography guidelines have been updated, Elizabeth Tracey reports Read More »…
  continue reading
 
If you’re a woman between the ages of 40 and 70, you should undergo screening mammography for breast cancer every two years, the United States Preventive Services Task Force has just recommended. Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center director William Nelson … Screening mammography guidelines have been updated, Elizabeth Tracey reports Read More »…
  continue reading
 
There may be no benefit to taking a drug that’s approved already for treating cancer in a clinical trial versus just receiving treatment, a new study finds. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, says benefits … Novel treatments for cancer may not be available outside clinical trials, Elizabeth Tracey reports Read Mo…
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There may be no benefit to taking a drug that’s approved already for treating cancer in a clinical trial versus just receiving treatment, a new study finds. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, says benefits … Novel treatments for cancer may not be available outside clinical trials, Elizabeth Tracey reports Read Mo…
  continue reading
 
There may be no benefit to taking a drug that’s approved already for treating cancer in a clinical trial versus just receiving treatment, a new study finds. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, says benefits … Novel treatments for cancer may not be available outside clinical trials, Elizabeth Tracey reports Read Mo…
  continue reading
 
There may be no benefit to taking a drug that’s approved already for treating cancer in a clinical trial versus just receiving treatment, a new study finds. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, says benefits … Novel treatments for cancer may not be available outside clinical trials, Elizabeth Tracey reports Read Mo…
  continue reading
 
People with cancer who enroll in clinical trials do better. That wisdom appears to have been dashed with results of a new study showing no survival benefit or any other positive outcome related to clinical trial participation. Johns Hopkins Kimmel … Should you participate in a clinical trial if you have cancer? Elizabeth Tracey reports Read More »…
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People with cancer who enroll in clinical trials do better. That wisdom appears to have been dashed with results of a new study showing no survival benefit or any other positive outcome related to clinical trial participation. Johns Hopkins Kimmel … Should you participate in a clinical trial if you have cancer? Elizabeth Tracey reports Read More »…
  continue reading
 
People with cancer who enroll in clinical trials do better. That wisdom appears to have been dashed with results of a new study showing no survival benefit or any other positive outcome related to clinical trial participation. Johns Hopkins Kimmel … Should you participate in a clinical trial if you have cancer? Elizabeth Tracey reports Read More »…
  continue reading
 
If you wear contact lenses you may be at particular risk to develop the condition known as dry eye, where your eyes may feel dry and scratchy. Lauren Gormley, an optometrist at Johns Hopkins, describes why wearing contacts may precipitate … Contact lens wearers may be at risk to develop dry eye, Elizabeth Tracey reports Read More »…
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If you wear contact lenses you may be at particular risk to develop the condition known as dry eye, where your eyes may feel dry and scratchy. Lauren Gormley, an optometrist at Johns Hopkins, describes why wearing contacts may precipitate … Contact lens wearers may be at risk to develop dry eye, Elizabeth Tracey reports Read More »…
  continue reading
 
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