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The New Humanitarian brings you an inside look at the conflicts and natural disasters that leave millions of people in need each year, and the policies and people who respond to them. Join TNH’s journalists in the aid policy hub of Geneva and in global hotspots to unpack the stories that are disrupting and shaping lives around the world.
 
In 2020, 1 in about 45 people need humanitarian assistance and protection. While these statistics are shocking, they don’t tell the complete human story. This podcast talks to people responding to crises, people affected by them, and writers telling their stories. It will explore if stories can create empathy and spark action to address the causes and consequences of humanitarian crises.
 
Following an official request from the UN Secretary General, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) is moving ahead with plans for a World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul in May 2016. The objective of the event – which will be the first-ever humanitarian summit of this scale and scope – is to set a future agenda for humanitarian action to ensure improved responsiveness to the changing humanitarian landscape in terms of greater needs, more diverse actors, new techno ...
 
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Hilarious Humanitarians Podcast

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Hilarious Humanitarians Podcast

Deanna Silverman, LCSW & Erin Prewitt

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Welcome Friends! We are Deanna Silverman, LCSW and Erin Prewitt, Intuitive Life Coach and together we make up the Hilarious Humanitarians podcast. Working as a life coach & Clinical Social Worker in various settings, from the emergency department, and foster care system to marriage and family counseling and inpatient psych facilities, we aim to bring you two unique perspectives on everything from relationships, body image, parenting, to self-care and, mental health. You will hear everything ...
 
Building more equitable and inclusive relationships and communities requires a commitment to increasing our understanding of diversity, inclusion, equity, and social justice in thought, and in practice. Actively committing ourselves to a lifetime of learning and critical self-reflection can show us the roles we can play in creating a better world by being the change we wish to see in it. Hosted by Social Worker, Social Justice Educator, Writer, and Organizational Consultant Relando Thompkins ...
 
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show series
 
For many countries in the Global South, tackling today’s interlocking crises – climate change, the pandemic, the rising cost of living supercharged by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine – is made practically impossible by sky-high interest rates on runaway government debt. Enter Barbados. No world leader is being invoked more at the moment than Barbadian…
 
For the first time in the COP summits’ nearly 30-year history, a call for climate reparations championed by the world’s most vulnerable nations has made it onto the official agenda. It’s formally called loss and damage, and it entails payouts from developed countries (who have profited the most from burning fossil fuels) to developing countries (wh…
 
All contribute, all decide, all benefit: the three pillars of a bold idea to transform how global public goods are financed. Once laughed off as a pie-in-the-sky idea, Global Public Investment (GPI) has been gaining traction in recent years and is increasingly seen as a plausible paradigm shift for a traditional aid system beholden to the whims of …
 
Soon after her interview with Degan Ali (Executive Director, Adeso) on whether decolonising aid is an oxymoron, our host, Heba Aly, moderated the launch of the Pledge for Change – a new set of commitments spearheaded by Adeso and other INGOs to reimagine their role in the aid sector by 2030.
 
Is decolonising aid a call for reform, or a call to end aid altogether? Are these two approaches mutually exclusive, or can they co-exist? Is decolonised aid even achievable within our current global governance system? Host Heba Aly discusses these tensions with one of the leaders of the movement to decolonise aid, Degan Ali, executive director of …
 
Ani Kazarian is a writer and professional development coach, both of which, she believes, come down to clarifying our vision and following our intuition. Her publications include book reviews, essays, and short stories that have been featured in Consequence Magazine, Agni Online, Sampsonia Way, Aster (ix) Journal, and the Tishman Review. She says, …
 
Anthony Langat is a Kenya-based reporter covering environment, climate change, health, and security. Topics discussed included drought, climate change, conflict, impact on pastoralism in Kenya, and more.
 
Megan Janetsky is a Colombia-based reporter and photographer covering migration, women's issues and human rights in Latin America. Topics discussed included crises and trends in Latin America, the COVID-19 hangover, social media, migration, political shifts, emerging crises, and more.
 
Thin Lei Win is an award-winning multimedia journalist specialising in food and climate issues for various international news media and also through her own newsletter Thin Ink. Topics discussed included food security, climate issues, what's happening in Myanmar, social media’s hate problem, humanitarian challenges, and more.…
 
Samir Elhawary is an Egyptian-British national and expert on conflict, humanitarian action, and war-to-peace transitions, with a particular focus on the Middle East and Latin America region. Currently, he is the Deputy Humanitarian Coordinator and Head of UN-OCHA in Caracas, Venezuela. He says, “Don’t be indifferent to human suffering. When you see…
 
Calls for arms to take precedence over humanitarian assistance in Ukraine are driving renewed discussions over the limits of aid neutrality. In this pop-up episode of the Rethinking Humanitarianism podcast, host Heba Aly sits down with Yevhenia Cravchuk, a Ukrainian member of parliament, Ukrainian first aid responder Fedir Serdiuk, and Robert Mardi…
 
“A poem can change you; A powerful short story can literally change your brain chemistry. At the individual level, the teaching of compassion, of love of community, these are the ways that I think literature probably moves us most effectively, but they're very hard to discern, I think. And you never know what that kind of reading experience is goin…
 
In this episode, Anna Macdonald, a Communications and Campaigns consultant and currently Human Rights Practitioner in Residence at Columbia Law School says, “In humanitarian work, there's a tendency to think that because it's a serious subject, we have to start with data, statistics, facts, and figures. These are important to provide the evidence, …
 
In this episode, I speak to François Batalingaya United Nations Resident Coordinator in Comoros. He says, let’s use the story of these women, Chika and the unnamed Hausa Woman, Halima’s mother, in A Private Experience, and say to ourselves, the other person out there isn’t an enemy, not at all, and you don't know when you may end up in a situation …
 
Russia's invasion has led to unprecedented levels of humanitarian support from big business. Leaders from the political and business world gathered in Davos, Switzerland in late May for the annual World Economic Forum, where the war in Ukraine topped the agenda. Since the start of the Russian invasion, companies have donated more than $1.4 billion …
 
The New Humanitarian hosted a debate on media coverage of humanitarian crises and why Ukraine has dominated Western media since the start of the war. Speaking with four panelist, TNH CEO Heba Aly discussed why some crises get more attention than others and what that tells us about our inherent biases. Panel guests: Patrick Gathara, media critic; Hu…
 
In February 2022, I had the privilege of interviewing Mr. Anthony Browder for a Black History Month special for The Hilltop focused on Washington D.C.. (See article "Black Inequality In Washington, D.C." here: https://thehilltoponline.com/2022/02/28/black-inequality-in-washington-d-c/This recording is the entire interview, with excerpts written for…
 
In this Episode, I speak to Askold Melnyczuk, an American writer whose publications include novels, essays, poems, memoir, and translations. Among his works are the novels, What Is Told, and Ambassador of the Dead, House of Widows and Excerpt from Smedley’s Secret Guide to World Literature. In his essay, Why My Favorite Characters to Write Are Ofte…
 
In this episode,Raksha Vasudevan, an Economist, Writer and former Aid Worker whose essays and reporting have appeared inThe New York Times, VICE, Guernica,and I,discussThe Story of a Brief MarriagebyAnuk Arudpragasam. She says,“The best way for me to answer this question is thinking about it in terms of contribution rather than attribution. I haven…
 
In this episode, I spoke with Alison Turner about her essay, The Autological Archive: Appraisal, Institutional Motives, and Essentializing Identity in Refugee and Asylum Seekers Narratives, In and Out of Fiction where she argues that fiction can expose parts of archival/application processes that impact who is and who is not granted asylum in the U…
 
How are mass surveillance, biometric data, and other high-tech border measures affecting refugees and migrants? In this episode of Fixing Aid, host Alae Ismail speaks to a Latinx community organiser and migration researchers on the use of border and surveillance technology aimed at stopping refugees and migrants from crossing European and American …
 
Is it possible to accurately predict how many people will be forcibly displaced in the future? If so, how might this help aid responses? In this episode of Fixing Aid, host Alae Ismail speaks to the Danish Refugee Council about the prediction tool they’ve developed with tech company IBM. Exploring both its potential and its limitations, she also he…
 
Is there a better way to organise the many tech-based tools that popped up in Poland to help refugees from Ukraine? In this episode of Fixing Aid, host Alae Ismail hears from a Ukrainian refugee there about her difficulties in getting information and support to rebuild her life, and talks to a tech entrepreneur trying to help. Ismail also speaks to…
 
Is there an efficient and secure way for refugees and others who have had to leave their homes and documents behind to establish and access digital I.D.s? In this episode of Fixing Aid, host Alae Ismail hears from a student who had to flee Sudan without I.D. papers and how that complicated his journey towards claiming asylum. She also speaks to two…
 
When you’re a member of the diaspora community, it can feel helpless watching a crisis unfold in your home country. In this episode of our podcast series, Fixing Aid, host Alae Ismail explores how a diaspora-led business turned global concern into emergency aid – delivered straight to families in the middle of Afghanistan’s humanitarian crisis. Gue…
 
Why’s it so difficult for people who need aid to give feedback on what they’ve received – or what they really need? In the first episode of the new podcast series Fixing Aid, host Alae Ismail hears from individuals in Somalia, the Philippines, and Zambia about their frustrations, and explores how existing technologies are being used to address thei…
 
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