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This course is intended for arts managers, arts funders and policy makers, artists, researchers, teachers, sympathizers, and thinkers. It is designed to provide a deeper understanding of some of the most pressing issues affecting the arts in the United States and around the world. It also seeks to examine the implications for the cultural sector of the rapidly changing political, economic and social context in which policies affecting cultural provision are formed and executed
 
The Global Current is the Seton Hall School of Diplomacy’s premier podcast on international affairs. Each week, we explore and analyze a news story making waves around the world. From the Capitol Hill riots to the Uighur camps in China, Current members break down pressing stories while engaging in thoughtful conversation with fellow students and faculty. Catch the Current on Instagram @TheGlobalCurrent and tune in live every Sunday at 8:30 a.m. EST on 89.5 FM WSOU.
 
Get straight to The Pressing Issues on current events, politics, foreign policy, and culture clashes of the day. Subscribe and enjoy on your favorite podcast app. Want to support the pod? First, subscribe to the podcast and follow us on social for the latest updates and behind-the-scenes info. Also, if you believe what we're doing matters, become a patron on Patreon to keep us going!Support the Podcast: https://www.patreon.com/ThePressingIssues
 
No Comp brings to you a new and soon to be the number one rated sport talk/wellness podcast... Giving you the insight and biggest news of current and past sporting events from all leagues Major to pop Warner . No league to small nor to big for our discussions. Also we will offer a few minutes from each segment to educate the community about health issues,causes and resolutions to improve the everyday health of every human Being.
 
So what do a couple of IT guys from Detroit talk about when they go to the bar? Welcome to the IT in the D show, brought to you by long-time Detroit IT veterans Bob Waltenspiel (The Sales Guy), and Dave Phillips (The Geek). The duo has been putting on free networking events for the metro Detroit information technology community for over 10 years, helped more than 1,200 people find new jobs, and been featured in local and national news stories and publications for their efforts. After taking ...
 
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Where are the vaccines? Vaccine clinics are having to close and cancel appointments in some of the hardest-hit areas in Ontario, and supply issues remain top of mind across the country. We talk to Kevin Smith, president and CEO of University Health Network in Toronto, and André Picard, health columnist for the Globe and Mail.…
 
Our virtual road trip, Canada's Road Ahead, takes us north to Dawson City, Yukon, where low COVID-19 case numbers and a high vaccination rate are starting to make life feel normal again. But for locals who work in the city's tourism industry, it's vital that the rest of the world catches up. We talk to Brad Whitelaw, owner of the Triple J Hotel; an…
 
Claire Matlock went from studying for final exams as a medical student in St. Vincent to helping people devastated by the La Soufrière volcano eruption. She tells us how she and her friends sprang into action to help evacuees.
 
Freelance journalist Georgia Fort discusses the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, who is being tried in Minneapolis for second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd. And as the city reels from the death of Daunte Wright — killed this week at a traffic stop — we talk to Pastor Curti…
 
Calgary writer Ashley Bristowe discusses her new memoir, My Own Blood, which tells the story of her son Alexander, who was born with a rare genetic condition. She wants people to understand what life is like for families of children with disabilities — and to be brave in creating communities that include them.…
 
Amid financial trouble, Laurentian University has cut more than 60 programs, and more than 100 faculty positions. Where does that leave a school that billed itself as unique, connecting the English, French and Indigenous cultures of northern Ontario? We speak to first-year student Aly Beauparlant, former faculty member Darrel Manitowabi, and Glen J…
 
An independent review of the Toronto police force's handling of missing-person cases, including the victims of serial killer Bruce McArthur, has found "systemic discrimination" contributed to police failings. We talk to Nicole Borthwick, whose friend Andrew Kinsman was murdered by McArthur; as well as Haran Vijayanathan, who was part of the report'…
 
New COVID-19 restrictions have polarized Albertans and in some cases sparked open defiance, including in Premier Jason Kenney's own party. Matt Galloway talks to Drew Barnes, the United Conservative Party MLA for Cypress-Medicine Hat, who opposes his leader's new round of measures. And Lisa Young, a professor of political science at the University …
 
Rebecca Carroll grew up as the only Black person in her small New Hampshire town, and didn't meet anyone else who looked like her until she was six. She talks about her new book Surviving the White Gaze: A Memoir, her search for identity, and the hard work she says is needed to truly understand each other.…
 
Families who suffer miscarriages often struggle in silence, but researchers say dismantling the stigma could help ensure more government and employer support. We talk to Laura Payton and Andrew Waterman, who wrote publicly about the losses their families experienced, and we hear from Cape Breton University assistant professor Stephanie Gilbert, who…
 
It was meant as a gesture in support of Indigenous women. A one of a kind design by an Indigenous artist known for her bold, provocative imagery. But when it comes to her latest work, it’s not what her art shows that’s sparked strife so much as where it’s shown—wrapped around a cold can of beer. Cue the beer can backlash, with some slamming the art…
 
Several universities across Canada are now battling COVID-19 outbreaks. Dr. Kieran Moore, medical officer of health for Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox & Addington Public Health, explains why rising cases among young people in Kingston, Ont., is cause for concern.
 
Feeling tired? Unmotivated? You might be experiencing pandemic burnout. We discuss the impact of long-term stress on our brains and memory with Dr. Roger McIntyre, professor of psychiatry and pharmacology at the University of Toronto, and Dr. Natasha Rajah, professor in the department of psychiatry at McGill University and the Douglas Research Cent…
 
As this pandemic drags on, scientists are already looking at how to prevent the next one — and some say a key factor will be tackling deforestation. We discuss why with Dr. Jonathan Epstein, a veterinarian and disease ecologist; Kimberly Fornace, an epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; and Terry Sunderland, a profes…
 
Yukon has come out with some of the most comprehensive coverage for transgender health care in North America, including surgeries that are deemed life-saving. We talk to Dr. Michael Marshall, one of the experts who helped create the gender-affirming care policy, and Chase Blodgett, president of the All Genders Yukon Society.…
 
North Korea is back in the news as it conducts fresh ballistic missile tests. The U.S. and its Asian allies like Japan and South Korea see the threat posed by a nuclear-armed North Korea; President Biden has already declared his intention not to meet with the North's leader, Kim Jong-Un. While the Trump administration tried to revive stalled nuclea…
 
The pink princess philodendron has become a coveted houseplant, with some enthusiasts paying more than $100 for a cutting. Has its popularity on social media played a role? We dig into the hype with Celia Aceae, a horticulturist based in Montreal.
 
Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh and husband of Queen Elizabeth, died Friday, at age 99. Matt Galloway talks to the CBC's senior London correspondent, Margaret Evans, and Ann MacMillan, who for years had a front row seat to the Royal family's lives as former CBC London bureau chief.
 
With election talk in the air in Ottawa, the Liberals and the NDP are holding their policy conventions. Our national affairs panel — Vassy Kapelos, host of the CBC's Power And Politics; and Shachi Kurl, president of the Angus Reid Institute — discuss what's at stake, and we hear from Anne McGrath, the NDP's national director.…
 
What's going on in Northern Ireland? After several nights of riots, we talk to journalist Chris Leebody about what's fuelling the violence. And Queen's University Belfast politics lecturer Peter McLoughlin discusses the Brexit factor, and why the Good Friday Agreement brought peace, but not reconciliation.…
 
As much of the country churns through a third wave, Atlantic Canada is cautiously getting back to normal. We talk to Halifax pub owner Joe McGuinness, who’s about to reopen, and ask Nova Scotia’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Robert Strang about how they got here, and what risks remain.
 
Bruce Fogle left Canada in the 1970s to become a veterinarian in swinging London, in one of the city’s poshest neighbourhoods. He joins us to discuss his 40-year career, and what he’s learned about our relationship with our animal friends.
 
In our latest stop on Canada’s Road Ahead, our virtual RV pulls into Fort McMurray, Alta., where last year’s devastating floods were compounded by the pandemic, and economic uncertainty. We talk to Jessica Rejman, who in the past year has dealt with flood damage, postponing her wedding, and facing the loss of her job in the energy sector; and Dan E…
 
Pregnant people weren’t included in initial COVID-19 vaccine trials, which raises a question for those expecting: should you get the vaccine when it’s offered, or wait until after birth? Shannon Higgins, who is five months along, explores that question in her documentary, Expecting a Shot.
 
Schools in some cities in Quebec and Ontario won't have in-person classes until at least mid-April. What goes into deciding if schools are open during a third wave? We ask Ashleigh Tuite, an infectious disease epidemiologist and an assistant professor at the University of Toronto's Dalla Lana School of Public Health.…
 
The pandemic has put a stop to trips to the sugar shack in Quebec this spring. But one initiative, Ma cabane à la maison, is allowing customers to order ready-made meals and enjoy them in the comfort — and safety — of their own homes.
 
As the third wave rises in Canada, are vaccines reaching the people who need them most, now? We talk to Nadia Theodore, senior vice-president of global government and industry relations for Maple Leaf Foods, about calls to vaccinate essential factory workers on site. And we discuss ways to improve the overall vaccine rollout with Dr. Zain Chagla, a…
 
Matt Galloway talks to Hunter Biden about his new book, Beautiful Things, about his experience of tragedy and trauma from a young age, the addiction issues that followed — and how it all played into his father's fight to become president of the United States.
 
The Yemen conflict rages on as fighting continues between the Saudi-led coalition and the rebel group known as the Houthis. The more than seven-year-long war created the world's worst humanitarian crisis in which Yemeni civilians face famine, threats of physical violence, and a non-existent economy. Join the Global Current today for the inaugural e…
 
Sign language classes will be part of the Ontario high school curriculum this fall, in a move that advocate Wanda Blackett thinks will "open up a lot of doors" in terms of understanding and accessibility for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community.
 
As a third wave of COVID-19 descends on Canada, we hear from some of those affected most, and ask what makes this part of the pandemic all the more challenging. Matt Galloway talks to Dr. Laveena Munshi, a critical care doctor in the ICU at Toronto's Mount Sinai Hospital, and a member of Ontario's COVID-19 science advisory table. Dianne Desjarlais …
 
As Canada's most famous psychic, Geraldine Smith sold out concert halls in the 1970s. Now her son Dr. Christian Smith, who also happens to be a scientist, has written The Psychic and the Scientist, exploring whether his mom actually has supernatural abilities.
 
Spring brings with it the return of birdsong, but last year's wildfires in Australia mean one bird, the regent honeyeater, isn't sounding as it should. Ross Crates, a research fellow at the Australian National University, explains the problem facing the regent honeyeater, and what's being done to help.…
 
Harry Hibbs was a legendary Newfoundland musician who helped bring the island's traditional music to the rest of Canada, selling millions of albums in the process. More than 30 years after his death, we hear about plans to bring his accordion home to Bell Island, N.L., this summer.
 
Critics say new voting laws in the U.S. state of Georgia will make it more difficult for Black people to cast a ballot — and some big corporate brands are joining the condemnation. We talk to Carol Anderson, professor of African American Studies at Emory University in Atlanta, Amna Kirmani, a marketing professor at the Robert H. Smith School of Bus…
 
American technology giants like Facebook and Google wield immense influence over the information we consume. Australia, in an effort to regulate these companies, recently passed a law requiring social media and search engine platforms to compensate news organizations for using their content. Facebook retaliated swiftly and instituted a five-day-lon…
 
In a conversation first aired in January, NFL star Laurent Duvernay-Tardif tells us why he has no regrets about skipping last season to work as an orderly in a long-term care facility in his home province of Quebec.
 
Matt Galloway talks to Toronto-based chef and restaurateur Suzanne Barr about being featured in Today's Special, a book celebrating 100 emerging chefs around the world. Barr discusses why the hospitality industry must face up to systemic problems around inclusivity and working conditions.
 
Long-term care residents might have thought getting vaccinated would mean more freedom, but now they face lockdowns due to outbreaks among unvaccinated staff. We talk to epidemiologist Dr. Sandro Galea and his dad, Emidio, who has just spent the last 14 days in his room; and Susan Mintzberg, a PhD candidate in the School of Social Work at McGill Un…
 
There are at least 30 Canadian women and their children at the al-Roj detention camp for families of ISIS militants in Syria. The CBC's Margaret Evans went there; she tells us what she saw, and what she heard from the Canadian women she talked to.
 
Many elders in the N.W.T. must move hundreds of kilometres to access care facilities as they age, cut off from their land and loved ones. We talk to elder and advocate Margaret Leishman in Kakisa, N.W.T., who wants more support for elders to age in place. Angela Grandjambe, housing manager for Fort Good Hope, tells us about a new facility that has …
 
Biologist Brenda Larison started noticing more zebras with aberrations in their coats: beige splotches, uneven stripe patterns. So she started digging, and learned that humans might be partially responsible. She tells us more.
 
Canine colonial. Is it apt to draw parallels between the worst ills of mainstream child welfare systems and those of animal welfare? It’s the potentially provocative thesis of the Vancouver Humane Society, a thesis they soon hope to put into practice. Joining host/producer Rick Harp for a decolonial discussion on dogs on and off the rez are MI regu…
 
What can the world do about the bloody crackdown in Myanmar? We talk to Tom Andrews, the UN special rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Myanmar, and Maung Zarni, an activist and founder of Forces of Renewal Southeast Asia, a group advocating for democracy in the region.
 
Have you had your COVID-19 vaccine, but you're still unsure what that allows, like hugging a loved one? Or are you still waiting, but also still wondering? Matt Galloway puts some common questions to experts Dr. Lisa Barrett, a clinician scientist with expertise in infectious disease and immunology at Dalhousie University, and Dr. Gerald Evans, an …
 
B.C. is facing a three-week "circuit breaker" lockdown to ease a sharp rise in COVID-19 cases, with Premier John Horgan singling out young people for not following guidelines, and telling them, "Do not blow this for the rest of us." Justin Kulik, a student at the University of British Columbia, objects to the premier's charge; and we discuss what's…
 
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