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Women make up half of the world's population, and yet history books often consign them to the sidelines. They are dismissed as merely the wives of powerful men; babymakers and nothing more. Yet women have been the driving force behind history for millennia, from female Pharoahs, warrior princesses and pirates, to the revolutionaries who sought to topple the male-dominated political systems of their day. From host of the popular 'Queens of England Podcast', The Other Half tells the forgotten ...
 
La storia è fatta dagli uomini. Eppure le donne hanno contribuito allo stesso modo allo sviluppo storico, politico e culturale, seppur spesso dimenticate dai libri.Questo podcast è un piccolo omaggio alle loro vite.Ogni martedì, vi racconterò in meno di 10 minuti le loro storie, sperando che siano di ispirazione a molti all'ascolto.
 
Comedian Samantha Baines celebrates amazing women in history with awesome modern-day women and non-binary peeps. Each episode features incredible guests joining Sam to share their achievements and experiences and talk about the heroines that inspired them to succeed. From topics serious to silly, subscribe for your weekly, no holds-barred chat between awesome wo-men (which are the same as men, just with a little more 'wooo') every Thursday. Follow us on @periodspodcast Subscribe @acast And f ...
 
Join us on the digital airwaves with History Factory Plugged In, a biweekly podcast that takes a refreshing look at the rich and sometimes provocative heritage of major U.S. and global organizations. Host Jason Dressel, Managing Director at History Factory, and his guests explore current events and other topics related to business heritage. Company history comes alive in this engaging, thought-provoking show.
 
These oral history interviews, conducted by Georgina Ferry, capture the stories of pioneering women at the forefront of research, teaching and service provision for computing in Oxford, 1950s-1990s. Themes throughout the interviews include career opportunities, gender splits in computing, the origins and development of computing teaching and research in Oxford, as well as development of the University of Oxford's Computing Service and the commercial software house the Numerical Algorithms Gr ...
 
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Sport in History Podcast

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Sport in History Podcast

British Society of Sports History

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The Sport in History Podcast brings you the latest in cutting edge research with interviews and talks with leading sports historians and up and coming researchers into Sports History. The podcast is a British Society of Sports History production from the UK's leading scholarly society for the history of sport. Click through to our website for further information on our events and to find out how to join the Society.
 
Musician and actor Collette Cooper delves into the rich history of female artists who helped develop Blues and Jazz - not just the vocalists like Billie Holiday and Bessie Smith but also the composers, band leaders and soloists. She speaks to broadcasters, writers and many of the up and coming artists on the UK Blues and Jazz scene today to find out what impact women have had and continue to have on this staple of popular culture.
 
"This Week in Black History, Society, and Culture" is a weekly podcast produced by the Black and African Diaspora Forum United (BADFU) an interracial group of faculty at Monmouth University concerned about issues pertaining to the Black/African American experience. BADFU members will periodically interview scholars, authors, activists, and community leaders on matters related to the history, society, and culture of Black and African American communities in the United States (U.S.) and beyond ...
 
Your healthy dose of women. Past and Present. Real and Fictional. Salty and Sweet. Grace and Michelle. Eavesdrop on our conversations about the famous and the not-so famous female identifying peeps that you may or may not have heard of. Giving her Her Moment in History. Hosted by Michelle Hassall and Grace Cooper
 
Join us as we travel across England visiting well-known wonders and some lesser-known places on your doorstep – all of which have helped make the country what it is today. From a hut in Bletchley Park where modern computing evolved, to the iron railings in London to which suffragettes chained themselves in the fight for women’s right to vote, we’ll step back in time to the very roots of our national identity to bring you the people and the stories that have helped shape England. Irreplaceabl ...
 
We at the Field of 68 media network are thrilled to announce the launch of a new series called 68 Shining Moments. We’ve spent the last four months amassing interviews with the people that lived the greatest, the most memorable moments in the history of the NCAA tournament. They take you through their experiences, their memories and share the stories you've never heard before about the moments you'll never forget.
 
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Tanya L. Roth's Her Cold War: Women in the U.S. Military, 1945–1980 (University of North Carolina Press, 2021) explains that while Rosie the Riveter had fewer paid employment options after being told to cede her job to returning World War II veterans, her sisters and daughters found new work opportunities in national defense. The 1948 Women's Armed…
 
We travel to fourteenth-century Naples to hear about one of the most powerful female rulers of the whole medieval period. Joanna of Naples is one of very few queens regnant in the Middle Ages - her reign was action-packed. Support the show on Patreon Follow us on Facebook and Twitter See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.…
 
Join Julia and a very special guest Shaylo Ren! BUY MERCH: https://www.teepublic.com/user/unsobered-podcast Support the Podcast: www.patreon.com/unsoberedpod Follow the Guest: Twitter: @shaylo_ren TikTok: @shaylo_ren Follow the Podcast: Twitter: @unsoberedpod Instagram: @unsoberedpod Contact the Podcast: unsoberedpod@gmail.com Follow the host: Inst…
 
This 2013 episode covers the taxidermist Potter, who had preserved and mounted 98 birds by the time he was 19. In 1880, his work had grown to a point where it had to be moved to a building, which became his museum. Potter's museum collection continues to enthrall collectors and enthusiasts. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodc…
 
Holly and Tracy discuss Perkin's idealism, and how many things in their lives are impacted by his work. Then they discuss "Who killed Cock Robin?' and Tracy's fascination with it as a child. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio
 
What motivated conscripted soldiers to fight in the Romanian Army during the Second World War? Why did they obey orders, take risks, and sometimes deliberately sacrifice their lives for the mission? What made soldiers murder, rape, and pillage, massacring Jews en masse during Operation Barbarossa? Grant Harward’s ground-breaking book Romania's Holy…
 
The next world war is 13 years away—that is, if you live in the world envisioned by Elliot Ackerman and James Stavridis, 2034: A Novel of the Next World War (Penguin, 2021). When writing about the intersection of combat and diplomacy, the co-authors draw from experience. Ackerman has worked in the White House and served five tours of duty as a Mari…
 
Today’s episode is the next installment of our Six Impossible Episodes series, and our second one on nursery rhymes. This one explores the historical context of Jack and Jill, London Bridge, Cock Robin and others. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio
 
Signed on September 2, 1945 aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay by Japanese and Allied leaders, the instrument of surrender formally ended the war in the Pacific and brought to a close one of the most cataclysmic engagements in history, one that had cost the lives of millions. VJ―Victory over Japan―Day had taken place two weeks…
 
In Jessie Barton Hronešová’s new book, The Struggle of Redress: Victim Capital in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020), she explores pathways to redress for main groups of victims/survivors of the 1992-5 Bosnian war —families of missing persons, victims of torture, survivors of sexual violence, and victims suffering physical disabiliti…
 
“The Europeans raise all the cattle, but the Chinese get all the milk.” This joke, told in colonial Singapore, was indicative of the importance of the Chinese diaspora throughout Southeast Asia. Chinese migrants were miners, laborers, merchants and traders: the foundation of many colonial cities throughout Asia--while also making sure that their ow…
 
A vast and desolate region, the Texas-New Mexico borderlands have long been an ideal setting for intrigue and illegal dealings--never more so than in the lawless early days of cattle trafficking and trade among the Plains tribes and Comancheros. This book takes us to the borderlands in the 1860s and 1870s for an in-depth look at Union-Confederate s…
 
"History Factory Plugged In” is back with a special Thanksgiving episode featuring Nicole Johnson, director of Butterball's Turkey Talk-Line, and Rebecca Welsh, senior brand manager at Butterball. With host Jason Dressel, they discuss 40 years of the Turkey Talk-Line and reminisce about some of their favorite Thanksgiving inquiries.Company history …
 
For Perkin, the creation of the first synthetic dye was the beginning of a career that combined chemistry and business to great success. And he got to see the world of industry change in response to his innovation. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio
 
In this episode, Hettie V. Williams is in discussion with Dr. Noliwe Rooks on a range of subjects. Williams is an Associate Professor at Monmouth University and Rooks is Chair and Professor in the Africana Studies Department at Brown University. She is an interdisciplinary school and her work examines how race and gender impact and are impacted by …
 
In Asphalt: A History (U Nebraska Press, 2021), Kenneth O’Reilly provides a history of this everyday substance. By tracing the history of asphalt—in both its natural and processed forms—from ancient times to the present, O’Reilly sets out to identify its importance within various contexts of human society and culture. Although O’Reilly argues that …
 
What does America’s growing dependence on modern information technology systems mean for the management of its nuclear weapons? In his new book, Cyber Threats and Nuclear Weapons (Stanford University Press, 2021), Dr. Herb Lin explores the promise and peril of managing the bomb in the digital age. A Senior Research Scholar at the Center for Interna…
 
Following the grisly murder of Joanna she ends up facing war from within and without her kingdom, all of which would end up with her on trial for her life in Avignon. Support the show on Patreon Follow us on Facebook and Twitter See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
It's the turbulent history of cricket and society in South Africa in this episode of the Sport in History Podcast brought to you by the British Society of Sport History in association with the Institute of Historical Research. This week Geoff talks to the cricket historian and previous podcast guest Dr Richard Parry.Rich - as he's known to friends …
 
American University professor Pamela Nadell taught a class about the rise in anti-Semitism in America between World War I and II. She described the 1915 lynching of Jewish man Leo Frank in Georgia, how international anti-Semitic texts made their way to America, and the role Henry Ford played in spreading anti-Jewish sentiments. Learn more about you…
 
This 2014 episode covers how pigments and dyes have historically come from all manner of animals, vegetables and minerals. From ochre to cochineal red to the rarest of purples, color has been an important part of human life for centuries. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
Tracy talks about the coincidences she encountered while researching this week's episodes. Talk then turns to how complicated Ida Tarbell's story is. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio
 
Tanya L. Roth's Her Cold War: Women in the U.S. Military, 1945–1980 (University of North Carolina Press, 2021) explains that while Rosie the Riveter had fewer paid employment options after being told to cede her job to returning World War II veterans, her sisters and daughters found new work opportunities in national defense. The 1948 Women's Armed…
 
The avocado is the iconic food of the twenty-first century. It has gone from a little-known regional food to a social media darling in less than a hundred years. This is an astounding trajectory for a fruit that isn’t sweet, becomes bitter when it is cooked and has perhaps the oddest texture of any fruit or vegetable. But the idea that this rich an…
 
Tarbell saw her family and community clash with Standard Oil when she was growing up. This second part covers her work for McClure’s Magazine and the most important journalistic work of her life – “The History of the Standard Oil Company.” Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
Ümit Kurt, born and raised in Gaziantep, Turkey, was astonished to learn that his hometown once had a large and active Armenian community. The Armenian presence in Aintab, the city’s name during the Ottoman period, had not only been destroyed―it had been replaced. To every appearance, Gaziantep was a typical Turkish city. Kurt digs into the details…
 
In the decades following the American Civil War, several of the generals who had laid down their swords picked up their pens and published accounts of their service in the conflict. In The Generals’ Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today (University of North Carolina Press, 2021), Stephen Cushman analyzes a half-dozen of these works to di…
 
All commanders know that an army (or navy) cannot operate without supplies, yet most aspects of war studies emphasize strategy, tactics, weaponry, and command. Master historian Jeremy Black fills a gap in war studies with his book, Logistics: The Key to Victory (Naval Institute Press, 2021) as a huge subject at the center of all conflict, globally …
 
Judith Shapiro and John-Andrew McNeish's book Our Extractive Age: Expressions of Violence and Resistance (Routledge, 2021) emphasizes how the spectrum of violence associated with natural resource extraction permeates contemporary collective life. Chronicling the increasing rates of brutal suppression of local environmental and labor activists in ru…
 
In the exhausted, repressive years that followed Napoleon's defeat in 1815, there was one cause that came to galvanize countless individuals across Europe and the United States: freedom for Greece. Mark Mazower's wonderful The Greek Revolution: 1821 and the Making of Modern Europe (Penguin, 2021) recreates one of the most compelling, unlikely and s…
 
The little-known history of U.S. survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings reveals captivating trans-Pacific memories of war, illness, gender, and community. The fact that there are indeed American survivors of the American nuclear attack on Hiroshima & Nagasaki is not common knowledge. Even in Hiroshima & Nagasaki the existence of Am…
 
Ida Tarbell was one of the first investigative journalists, and the biggest work of her life involved exposing exploitive and illegal business practices at Standard Oil. Part one covers her early life, which led her to that story. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
Today I talked to Rosa Abreu-Runkel about her new book Vanilla: A Global History (Reaktion Books, 2020). Intoxicating and evocative, vanilla is so much more than a spice rack staple. It is a flavor that has defined the entire world—and its roots reach deep into the past. With its earliest origins dating back seventy million years, the history of va…
 
In the ten episodes of Season 1 hear secretly recorded conversations President Lyndon Johnson made on topics including the Warren Commission, the Vietnam War, the March on Selma, and more. Find it wherever you listen to podcasts starting 11/22 and follow it today so you never miss an episode. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adc…
 
Former Charleston, South Carolina Mayor Joseph Riley, and professor Kerry Taylor co-teach a course at The Citadel military college looking at why a new African American history museum is being built in the city. They’re joined by Walter Hood. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices…
 
When Prince Pedro of Portugal was married off in the 1300s, he only had eyes for his new wife's lady in waiting. This 2017 episode about the relationship between Inês and Pedro has everything: romance, deception, murder, and a corpse crowned as queen. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
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