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La storia è fatta dagli uomini. Eppure le donne hanno contribuito allo stesso modo allo sviluppo storico, politico e culturale, seppur spesso dimenticate dai libri.Questo podcast è un piccolo omaggio alle loro vite.Ogni martedì, vi racconterò in meno di 10 minuti le loro storie, sperando che siano di ispirazione a molti all'ascolto.
 
Comedian Samantha Baines celebrates amazing women in history with awesome modern-day women and non-binary peeps. Each episode features incredible guests joining Sam to share their achievements and experiences and talk about the heroines that inspired them to succeed. From topics serious to silly, subscribe for your weekly, no holds-barred chat between awesome wo-men (which are the same as men, just with a little more 'wooo') every Thursday. Follow us on @periodspodcast Subscribe @acast And f ...
 
These oral history interviews, conducted by Georgina Ferry, capture the stories of pioneering women at the forefront of research, teaching and service provision for computing in Oxford, 1950s-1990s. Themes throughout the interviews include career opportunities, gender splits in computing, the origins and development of computing teaching and research in Oxford, as well as development of the University of Oxford's Computing Service and the commercial software house the Numerical Algorithms Gr ...
 
"This Week in Black History, Society, and Culture" is a weekly podcast produced by the Black and African Diaspora Forum United (BADFU) an interracial group of faculty at Monmouth University concerned about issues pertaining to the Black/African American experience. BADFU members will periodically interview scholars, authors, activists, and community leaders on matters related to the history, society, and culture of Black and African American communities in the United States (U.S.) and beyond ...
 
Join us on the digital airwaves with History Factory Plugged In, a biweekly podcast that takes a refreshing look at the rich and sometimes provocative heritage of major U.S. and global organizations. Host Jason Dressel, Managing Director at History Factory, and his guests explore current events and other topics related to business heritage. Company history comes alive in this engaging, thought-provoking show.
 
Your healthy dose of women. Past and Present. Real and Fictional. Salty and Sweet. Grace and Michelle. Eavesdrop on our conversations about the famous and the not-so famous female identifying peeps that you may or may not have heard of. Giving her Her Moment in History. Hosted by Michelle Hassall and Grace Cooper
 
Join us as we travel across England visiting well-known wonders and some lesser-known places on your doorstep – all of which have helped make the country what it is today. From a hut in Bletchley Park where modern computing evolved, to the iron railings in London to which suffragettes chained themselves in the fight for women’s right to vote, we’ll step back in time to the very roots of our national identity to bring you the people and the stories that have helped shape England. Irreplaceabl ...
 
We at the Field of 68 media network are thrilled to announce the launch of a new series called 68 Shining Moments. We’ve spent the last four months amassing interviews with the people that lived the greatest, the most memorable moments in the history of the NCAA tournament. They take you through their experiences, their memories and share the stories you've never heard before about the moments you'll never forget.
 
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A century ago, it was a given that a woman with a college degree had to choose between having a career and a family. Today, there are more female college graduates than ever before, and more women want to have a career and family, yet challenges persist at work and at home. This book traces how generations of women have responded to the problem of …
 
On this day in 1873, in response to the horrific treatment of female inmates at unisex prisons, the state of Indiana established the country’s first prison exclusively for women. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
In late 1888, five women were brutally murdered in a slum neighborhood of London. The violent killer earned himself a nickname - Jack the Ripper. But everything you think you know murders and those murdered women is wrong. In a new 15-part series, historian Hallie Rubenhold tells you the real story of those victims and how they came to be in the pa…
 
Join Julia as she continues talking about Leia Organa! BUY MERCH: https://www.teepublic.com/user/unsobered-podcast Support the Podcast: www.patreon.com/unsoberedpod Follow the Podcast: Twitter: @unsoberedpod Instagram: @unsoberedpod Contact the Podcast: unsoberedpod@gmail.com Follow the host: Instagram: @juliagoestexas Twitter: @juliagoestexas Yout…
 
This 2011 episode from previous hosts Sarah and Deblina covers the story of Marie Tussaud and her famous wax figures. So who exactly was she, and how did she create one of the world's most popular museums? Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio
 
Tracy and Holly discuss a surprise change to the research process for Unearthed! episodes. They also talk about analysis of post-mortem stomach contents, and discuss memories of a deceased, beloved actor. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio
 
On this day in 1797, French balloonist André-Jacques Garnerin descended 3,200 feet through the skies of Paris, becoming the first person to float safely to the ground using a frameless parachute. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
Kelefa Sanneh was born in England, and lived in Ghana and Scotland before moving with his parents to the United States in the early 1980s. He was a pop music critic at the New York Times from 2000-2008, and has been a staff writer at the New Yorker since then. His first book, just released on Penguin, is called Major Labels: A History of Popular Mu…
 
On this day in 1966, an avalanche of coal waste swept through the village of Aberfan in South Wales, claiming the lives of 144 people. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
Part 2 of our October 2021 coverage of items literally or figuratively unearthed covers exhumations, shipwrecks, books and letters, and edibles and potables. And it starts with potpourri - things that don't quite fit anywhere else. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
On this day in 1962, America’s first fully automated post office began service in Providence, Rhode Island. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
Dr. Leonidas Mylonakis (PhD in History from the University of California, San Diego) is the author of Piracy in the Eastern Mediterranean: Maritime Marauders in the Greek and Ottoman Aegean (Bloomsbury, 2021). This captivating book is based on rich sets of Ottoman, Greek, and other archival sources. Dr. Mylonakis shows that far from ending with the…
 
On this day in 1901, the popular marching song “Pomp and Circumstance” was performed live for the very first time — but not at a graduation. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
Laurence Coderre’s Newborn Socialist Things: Materiality in Maoist China (Duke UP, 2021) is an exciting book that considers Chinese socialist culture seriously in terms of materiality and theory by tracing the contours of Maoist China through the heretofore unexpected lens of the commodity and consumerism. In Coderre’s book, the “newborn socialist …
 
This October 2021 instance of Unearthed! covers updates, some oldest things, animals and graves. There's also an exception to the show's moratorium on including coin hoards in unearthing episodes. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio
 
On this day in 1906, a German shoemaker named Friedrich Wilhelm Voigt impersonated an army officer and tricked a group of soldiers into helping him commit a daring robbery. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
In this episode, Dr. Katie Parkin discusses Pushing Cool with Dr. Keith A. Wailoo. Parkin is a Professor of History at Monmouth University and the Jules Plangere, Jr., Endowed Chair in American Social History. She is the author of Food is Love: Advertising and Gender Roles in Modern America (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005) and Women at the …
 
Former Charleston, South Carolina Mayor Joseph Riley and professor Kerry Taylor co-teach a course at The Citadel military college looking at why a new African American history museum is being built in the city. They're joined by Harvard University professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. who talks about his work with PBS on the documentary "Reconstruction: …
 
This 2018 episode covers an even from June 30, 1908, when at approximately 7:15am, the sky over Siberia lit up with what was described by witnesses as a massive fireball, or the sky engulfed in fire. For the last century, scientists have been trying to figure out exactly what happened. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastne…
 
On this day in 1923, young cartoonist Walt Disney and his big brother Roy founded the Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio in Hollywood, California. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
Tracy and Holly discuss problematic aspects of trials and the parts of Rice's story that they each found themselves thinking about. Then, Palmer's status as a doctor is discussed, as well as the weird but unsubstantiated parts of his story that didn't make it into the episode. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
On this day in 1860, a young girl named Grace Bedell wrote a letter to Abraham Lincoln, urging him to grow a beard before the upcoming election. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
The story of the American newsroom is that of modern American journalism. In The American Newsroom: A History, 1920-1960 (University of Missouri Press, 2021), Will Mari documents a time of great change and controversy in the field, one in which journalism was produced in "news factories" by news workers with dozens of different roles, and not just …
 
Robert Hellyer’s Green with Milk and Sugar: When Japan Filled America's Tea Cups (Columbia UP, 2021) is a tale of American and Japanese teaways, skillfully weaving together stories of Midwesterners drinking green tea (with milk and sugar, to be sure), the recent and complex origins of Japan's love of now-ubiquitous sencha, Ceylon tea merchants expl…
 
In Mexico environmental struggles have been fought since the nineteenth century in such places as Zacatecas, where United States and European mining interests have come into open conflict with rural and city residents over water access, environmental health concerns, and disease compensation. In Silver Veins, Dusty Lungs: Mining, Water, and Public …
 
The 1830s to the 1930s saw the rise of large-scale industrial mining in the British imperial world. Elizabeth Carolyn Miller examines how literature of this era reckoned with a new vision of civilization where humans are dependent on finite, nonrenewable stores of earthly resources, and traces how the threatening horizon of resource exhaustion work…
 
On this day in 1975, Ronald DeFeo Jr. stood trial for the brutal killing of his six family members — a crime known today as the Amityville murders. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
William Palmer often turns up on lists of historical serial killers. Though his trial for murder is generally considered a settled case, it was judged without any hard evidence. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio
 
On this day in 1958, a marmalade-loving bear cub appeared for the first time when A Bear Called Paddington was published. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
Luci Marzola's book Engineering Hollywood: Technology, Technicians, and the Science of Building Studio System (Oxford University Press, 2021) tells the story of the formation of the Hollywood studio system not as the product of a genius producer, but as an industry that brought together creative practices and myriad cutting-edge technologies in way…
 
On this day in 1609, the original version of the popular children’s nursery rhyme “Three Blind Mice” was published for the first time in London. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
On this day in 1975, sketch comedy series Saturday Night Live broadcast its first episode live from Studio 8H in Rockefeller Center. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
Potatoes are the world's fourth most important food crop, yet they were unknown to most of humanity before 1500. Rebecca Earle, Feeding the People: The Politics of the Potato (Cambridge UP, 2020) traces the global journey of this popular foodstuff from the Andes to everywhere. The potato's global history reveals the ways in which our ideas about ea…
 
On this day in 1845, the United States Naval Academy opened its doors in Annapolis, Maryland, with a class of 50 midshipmen and seven professors. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
In this episode, Dr. Hettie V. Williams in conversation with Dr. Chris DeRosa about Black Reconstruction and “reconstructions” in U.S. history. Dr. DeRosa is Associate Professor of History and Chair of the Department of History and Anthropology at Monmouth University. Black Reconstruction in America, 1860-1880 is the title of a book published in 19…
 
This 2017 episode covers Hernandez v. Texas, which addressed civil rights for Mexican Americans, was the first case to be argued before the Supreme Court by Mexican American attorneys, and set a new precedent in how the 14th Amendment was interpreted in terms of race and ethnicity. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwor…
 
On this day in 1992, a meteorite the size of a bowling ball crashed into a parked Chevy Malibu in a suburb of Peekskill, New York. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
Tracy shares her limited knowledge of Crowley before she started researching the podcast, and the incomprehensible nature of some of Crowley's writing. They also discuss the many ways that Cagliostro has popped up in media through the years, and what has often been called his wife's betrayal. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpo…
 
An English mission to Japan arrives in 1613 with all the standard English commodities, including wool and cloth: which the English hope to trade for Japanese silver. But there’s a gift for the Shogun among them: a silver telescope. As Timon Screech explains in his latest book, The Shogun’s Silver Telescope: God, Art, and Money in the English Quest …
 
When Google announced that it planned to digitize books to make the world's knowledge accessible to all, questions were raised about the roles and responsibilities of libraries, the rights of authors and publishers, and whether a powerful corporation should be the conveyor of such a fundamental public good. Along Came Google: A History of Library D…
 
He’s connected with everything from petty crime to mysticism to claims of nearly eternal life to one of the most famous deceptions in all of history. Cagliostro's life is veiled in the mythology he created for himself, but what remains when you peel back the mythos? Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
On this day in 1961, in a letter to the Committee on Civil Defense, President John F. Kennedy advised American families to build fallout shelters as protection against a possible nuclear exchange with the Soviet Union. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
On this day in 1969, just before 11pm, the first episode of the groundbreaking comedy series Monty Python's Flying Circus premiered in the United Kingdom. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comiHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
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