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This collection transports you to Europe of 1600 to 1850. Many of the foundations of European culture were being laid: commerce, arts institutions, art displays, terraced houses … even tattooing. Things we now take for granted in the fabric of our lives. Yet here we glimpse them through the eyes of a society for whom they weren’t yet set in stone. The shape of the urban environment was being defined. Yet there was a burgeoning nostalgia for all things rural, and a hunger for the trappings of ...
 
This podcast is dedicated to self-growth, emotional well-being, and becoming the best versions of ourselves possible! You will find everything to do with personal development and self-help with topics ranging from anxiety relief, cultivating joy, conscious living, motivation, psychology, emotional intelligence and more! It's never too late to make positive changes. Let's make life extraordinary!
 
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In Part One of our series on the life, work, and legacy of Howard Zinn, Justin Rogers-Cooper and I read Zinn’s 1994 memoir You Can’t Be Neutral on a Moving Train and extract some of the juiciest bits of an extraordinary life: Zinn’s Dickensian childhood and seething class rage, his teenage experience with communists and police in 1930s New York Cit…
 
In this episode we're heading into space with the cult sci-fi movie, Moontrap, from 1988. Along the way Colin explains how he identifies his chickens, Paul creates his own religion, and we question the use of machine guns in space. Music is from the film and composed by Joseph LoDuca.Colin and Paul
 
Rax King returns to the Trap to tell us all about her new book Tacky: Love Letters to the Worst Culture We Have to Offer, which surveys the wreckage of 21st century American pop culture and finds much to salvage, and even to (gasp) love. From Creed and Jersey Shore to Hot Topic and The Cheesecake Factory, this conversation explores how the line bet…
 
The Importance of Self-Belief - how to learn to trust yourself and believe in your ability to succeed / how to increase self efficacy - PSYCHOLOGY & SELF DEVELOPMENT PODCAST - Self-efficacy (self belief) is concept originally developed the psychologist Albert Bandura and it refers to our own beliefs about our capabilities and ability to achieve goa…
 
Sam Stein is a housing policy analyst and advocate in New York City; his book Capital City: Gentrification and the Real Estate State reveals the horrifying machinations of real estate developers and the neoliberal state, who build massive luxury towers for billionaires while the city’s middle and working class citizens deal with skyrocketing rents,…
 
In this episode we're firing our critical arrows at ITV's Robin of Sherwood from 1984. Along the wooded path Paul wishes for his own little devil to help with the gardening, Colin likes a splash around, and we reminisce about old ITV logos. Opening theme from the series by Clannad.Colin and Paul
 
What is “trauma porn” and what role does it play on the left? Yasmin Nair joins us to discuss her recent piece, “AOC and the Weaponization of Trauma,” which explores the uncomfortable dynamics of race, gender and class at play in the public thirst for graphic stories of trauma, abuse, and suffering, and the toxic place that “trauma” holds in Americ…
 
As he approaches a major personal milestone, our good friend and Nostalgia Trap producer Peter Sabatino joins me for an honest conversation about the role alcohol has played in our respective lives. From the roaring 20s of college-age binge drinking to the high-octane craft IPA world of the hipster dad, we explore how drugs and alcohol become entan…
 
Max Chafkin, author of The Contrarian: Peter Thiel and Silicon Valley’s Pursuit of Power (see Episode 294), returns for a conversation all about SpaceX cowboy Elon Musk. Is this guy a tech genius saving the planet from climate change and launching us into a beautiful robotic future, or a capitalist huckster whose only talent is convincing authorita…
 
Could a Red Hot Chili Peppers song from 1999 hold the key to understanding the political economy of 21st century tech culture and the globalization of Hollywood’s vampiric vision of human nature? As Justin Roger-Cooper explains on our 300th (!!!) episode, sure, why not?
 
Chegamos ao tão sonhado centésimo episódio do nosso podcast Jogo Véio. Fizemos um episódio ao vivo com vocês em nosso canal do YouTube e todo o áudio dessa conversa você confere agora em seu feed. Obrigado por todo apoio e vamos rumo aos 200 episódios!Jogo Véio
 
In our Halloween episode we're slicing and dicing our way through, Friday 13th Part 3, from 1982. Along the way we discuss what a Herbie/Jason crossover could be like, Paul homages himself, and Colin gives Paul garden furniture advice. How can you resist? Music is by Harry Manfredini.Colin and Paul
 
This week Freddie deBoer joins me to talk about his recent Substack piece “Smoking Weed Doesn’t Feel Good for Me Anymore, and It Hasn’t for a Long Time,” exploring how cannabis legalization, stronger weed, and just plain getting older have caused us both to interrogate our personal weed consumption and stoner identities. This conversation touches o…
 
HOW TO STOP HOLDING A GRUDGE AND LET GO OF ANGER & RESENTMENT: Are you feeling bitter, holding grudges, or trapped in a loop of negative emotions when replaying the actions or words of other people in your mind over and over? Do you dream of getting even, getting revenge, or feel like your emotions are getting the best of you? Are you simply findin…
 
Part Two of our conversation with Yasmin Nair on death and grief in the COVID era. Check out Yasmin’s incredible archive of writing, including many of the pieces discussed in this episode, here: yasminnair.com.
 
Andrew Schustek joins us to discuss the extraordinary Japanese horror film Cure (1997), one of a number of unbelievably prescient works directed by Kiyoshi Kurosawa that take on the nightmarish social and political reality of Japan’s “lost decades.” In this conversation, we explain why Cure stands alone, as both a unique piece of horror craftsmansh…
 
The one and only Yasmin Nair joins us this week for a wide-ranging discussion on a topic near and dear to all of us: death. In Part One of our conversation, we talk about how the politics of COVID have created a cruel public theater that showcases American culture’s deeply weird, and deeply disturbing, attitudes about death, grief, and what we owe …
 
Join us as we travel down the cul-de-sac that is the short lived American series, The Highwayman, from 1987-88. Along the journey we wonder how a rural sheriff has so many Police cars, we take a stop at the exposition car park, and reverse into a conversation about stealth. Music is by Stu Phillips.Colin and Paul
 
Max Chafkin is an editor at Bloomberg Businessweek whose new book, The Contrarian: Peter Thiel and Silicon Valley’s Pursuit of Power tells the unbelievable true story of Peter Thiel’s rise to power through strategic investment and control over massive tech firms. From his assassination of Gawker (remember the Hulk Hogan lawsuit? Thiel funded it.) t…
 
Justin joins us to talk about Ross Barkan’s incredible book The Prince: Andrew Cuomo, Coronavirus, and the Fall of New York, as we discuss some of the wilder implications of Cuomo’s sickening “daddy” image among liberals, who fell in love with a television image curated for their pleasure. In this conversation Justin finally defines his oft-uttered…
 
Ross Barkan is a journalist who has been covering New York state politics, in particular the governorship of Andrew Cuomo, for the last eight years. He joins us to discuss his book The Prince: Andrew Cuomo, Coronavirus, and the Fall of New York, which provides stunning details of the (now ex-) governor’s handling of COVID, and how his deft manipula…
 
In this episode we're spacing out with the film, Saturn 3 (1980). Along the way we talk about the troubled production of this Kirk Douglas, Farrah Fawcett, and Harvey Keitel, sci-fi thriller; we discover Paul's opinion of Fawcett, complain about airlocks in ceiling and wonder why people don't call killer droids nice names. Music is by Elmer Bernste…
 
For the conclusion of our 9/11 trilogy, Justin Rogers-Cooper and I watch Alfonso Cuarón's 2006 cinematic masterpiece Children of Men, a work that has moved and obsessed both of us for years. We reflect on how the film uncannily captures the alternative future 9/11 launched us into — a world in which the apocalyptic background is getting closer and …
 
For Part Two of our 9/11 trilogy, Justin Rogers-Cooper helps us untangle the world of 9/11 truthers and related conspiracy theories, as we explore how the attacks and their aftermath destabilized consensus reality and led us into a new landscape of weaponized digital information. This conversation covers a lot of territory, from Alex Jones to Burn …
 
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