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Unapologetically Caribbean, Carry On Friends The Caribbean American Podcast is where you'll find fresh, funny, inspiring stories and perspectives on Caribbean culture, Caribbean heritage, career, entrepreneurship and everyday life that make up the Caribbean American experience. Carry On Friends is hosted by Kerry-Ann Reid-Brown.
 
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Main Street to the World

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Main Street to the World

April Botta, Whitney Mattox, & Lynne Macolini

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We love to talk travel so we're sharing this weekly travel podcast with you to share our recommendations, thoughts, tips, and suggestions about our favorite destinations including Walt Disney World, Universal Parks & Resorts, SeaWorld, cruises, all-inclusive resorts, and much more. Listen in to hear the ins and outs for sights around the country and across the globe. ---------- Connect with us on https://www.facebook.com/MainStreetToTheWorld/ or https://www.instagram.com/mainstreettotheworld ...
 
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Destination Everywhere

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Destination Everywhere

Andy McNeill & Todd Bludworth

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Come along for travel adventures of a lifetime, as we join hospitality and travel entrepreneurs Andy McNeill and Todd Bludworth in search of the world’s best meeting and travel destinations. They’re checking-in with celebrities in the know, hospitality experts and native connoisseurs to discover inspirational venues and things to do. Explore the world’s most unique and desirable hotels, exotic foods with top chefs, and must-do experiences along the way. Andy and Todd go back to their favorit ...
 
Down in Cuba is a late in life coming out story about a man stuck in a routine marriage and an unremarkable career as a professor of Latin American Studies at a small California college. In a last ditch effort to save himself from the ennui of mid life, Martin heads to Cuba on sabbatical to write a book about Cuban icon, Jose Marti. With the confusing mores of modern Cuba on one side and his personal demons on the other, he meets a charismatic young artist, who leads him down a road of passi ...
 
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It's the end of the year already! Thank you for listening and supporting Carry On Friends in 2021. And I look forward to your continued support in 2022. Here's a quick message to say THANK YOU as well as the episodes that were the fan favorites for 2021. Did I miss your favorite? Didn't get a chance to provide your feedback? Here's a quick way to l…
 
Over the course of the twentieth century, campaigns to increase access to modern birth control methods spread across the globe and fundamentally altered the way people thought about and mobilized around reproduction. This book explores how a variety of actors translated this movement into practice on four islands (Jamaica, Trinidad, Barbados, and B…
 
Covering the period from the interwar years through the arrival of the steamship SS Empire Windrush from Jamaica in 1948 and culminating in the period of decolonization in the British Caribbean by the early 1970s, James Cantres’ Blackening Britain: Caribbean Radicalism from Windrush to Decolonization (Rowman & Littlefield, 2020) situates the develo…
 
Brand new guest Shannon Jowett is so lucky to be on the first Christmas Episode of the season. His choices are a little bit unusual, but definitely from a festive film, while Lasse brings something much more traditional, but also very recent to the table.Sideshow Sound Theatre
 
Gone Missing in Harlem by Karla FC Holloway (TriQuarterly 2021) tells the story of an African American family trying to survive the early decades of the twentieth century. The Mosbys leave their life in Sedalia within hours after six-year-old Percy loudly notes that his father’s boss has made a mistake in calculating what is owed. Percy’s parents k…
 
Welcome to The Academic Life! In this episode you’ll hear about: Dante Stewart’s path through college and into his current graduate school, playing football for Clemson, why former college athletes need to advocate for current student players’ rights, why he chose to go into the seminary at Emery, his grandmother, and a discussion of Shoutin’ in Th…
 
One Hundred Years of Solitude is a revered classic today fifty five years after it was first published in 1967. Today I talked to Alvaro Santana Acuña a sociologist and historian who describes the ingredients that went into manufacturing the success of this book. In Ascent to Glory: How One Hundred Years of Solitude Was Written and Became a Global …
 
ND stages a trialogue this week with MacArthur "Genius" Cristina Rivera Garza and Notre Dame critics Kate Marshall and Dominique Vargas. Professor Rivera Garza recalls roadtripping through Mexico in a bochito (a Volkswagen). For her, such drives became the mother of literary invention: there was no car radio and when family conversations died down,…
 
Brand new guest Tim Halbur joins Track Swap and brings a classic to the show, while Lasse chooses something matching, but much more contemporary. Link: https://twitter.com/HalburSideshow Sound Theatre
 
Getting Something to Eat in Jackson (Princeton Press, 2021) uses food—what people eat and how—to explore the interaction of race and class in the lives of African Americans in the contemporary urban South. Dr. Joseph Ewoodzie Jr. examines how “foodways”—food availability, choice, and consumption—vary greatly between classes of African Americans in …
 
Known around the world simply as Lula, Luis Inácio Lula da Silva was born in 1945 to illiterate parents who migrated to industrializing São Paulo. He learned to read at ten years of age, left school at fourteen, became a skilled metalworker, rose to union leadership, helped end a military dictatorship--and in 2003 became the thirty-fifth president …
 
For all that is known about the depth and breadth of African American history, we still understand surprisingly little about the lives of African American children, particularly those affected by northern emancipation. But hidden in institutional records, school primers and penmanship books, biographical sketches, and unpublished documents is a ric…
 
In the early twentieth century, when many US unions disgracefully excluded black and Asian workers, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) warmly welcomed people of color, in keeping with their emphasis on class solidarity and their bold motto: "An Injury to One Is an Injury to All!" A brilliant union organizer and a humorous orator, Benjamin Fl…
 
Kevin Bruyneel confronts the chronic displacement of Indigeneity in the politics and discourse around race in American political theory and culture, arguing that the ongoing influence of settler-colonialism has undermined efforts to understand Indigenous politics while also hindering conversation around race itself. By reexamining major episodes, t…
 
During the height of the Cold War, passionate idealists across the US and Africa came together to fight for Black self-determination and the antiracist remaking of society. Beginning with the 1957 Ghanaian independence celebration, the optimism and challenges of African independence leaders were publicized to African Americans through community-bas…
 
How do we narrate history, both the troubling past and what we chose to remember? Clint Smith sets out to wrestle with this question and its relationship to enslavement in his first nonfiction book, How the Word is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America (Little, Brown and Company, 2021). From Monticello plantation to Angola …
 
Welcome to the Main Street to the World Podcast where we will be talking everything travel each week. We are joined Chrissie Lograno-Weinstein & Robin Wright. They are both Vacation Specialists with Coasters & Castles Travel. They had the opportunity to sail on the Disney Magic and are sharing their Disney Cruise Line Experience post Covid. The Mai…
 
I sat down with award winning author Tessa Bridal to talk about her latest book, The Dark Side of Memory: Uruguay's Disappeared Children and the Families Who Never Stopped Searching, published by Invisible Ink (October 2021). The Dark Side of Memory examines the largely unknown history of the state sponsored kidnapping of children in Uruguay and Ar…
 
Another day, another Powell: Josh from Film Score And More returns to Track Swap, this time with a much more recent John Powell score. Lasse brings another great composer with him and presents a score which often seems to get overlooked. Tune in and prepare to be enchanted!Sideshow Sound Theatre
 
A vast and desolate region, the Texas-New Mexico borderlands have long been an ideal setting for intrigue and illegal dealings--never more so than in the lawless early days of cattle trafficking and trade among the Plains tribes and Comancheros. This book takes us to the borderlands in the 1860s and 1870s for an in-depth look at Union-Confederate s…
 
Steven P. Brown, professor of political science at Auburn University, has written a history of notable U.S. Supreme Cases and justices that hailed from Alabama. In Alabama Justice: The Cases and Faces That Changed a Nation (U Alabama Press, 2020), Brown reviews eight landmark cases which originated in Alabama and were eventually reviewed by the U.S…
 
In the bonus episode, of Carry On Friends we’re doing an episode swap with Style & Vibes featuring the Small Axe episode. Small Axe is a British anthology film series, created and directed by Steve McQueen. The anthology consists of five films that tell distinct stories about the lives of West Indian immigrants in London from the 1960s to the 1980s…
 
Brazil markets itself as a racially mixed utopia. The United States prefers the term melting pot. Both nations have long used the image of the mulatta to push skewed cultural narratives. Highlighting the prevalence of mixed race women of African and European descent, the two countries claim to have perfected racial representation-all the while igno…
 
Brazil markets itself as a racially mixed utopia. The United States prefers the term melting pot. Both nations have long used the image of the mulatta to push skewed cultural narratives. Highlighting the prevalence of mixed race women of African and European descent, the two countries claim to have perfected racial representation-all the while igno…
 
The avocado is the iconic food of the twenty-first century. It has gone from a little-known regional food to a social media darling in less than a hundred years. This is an astounding trajectory for a fruit that isn’t sweet, becomes bitter when it is cooked and has perhaps the oddest texture of any fruit or vegetable. But the idea that this rich an…
 
Welcome to the Main Street to the World Podcast where we will be talking everything travel each week. We are joined again by Madelyn & Vivienne Mattox. They are sharing their experiences of Ratatouille, the 50th Anniversary, and Cinderella's Royal Table. The Main Street to the World Podcast is hosted by April Botta, Whitney Mattox, & Lynne Macolini…
 
Rob Rawdon returns to Track Swap. We are discussing comedy scores again, although this time, they are not quite as silly. Rob brings the score of a beloved classic, while Lasse’s choice is a much more recent film, although the music is refreshingly oldschool. Listen and have fun!Sideshow Sound Theatre
 
Beginning on the shores of West Africa in the sixteenth century and ending in the U.S. Lower South on the eve of the Civil War, Alexis Wells-Oghoghomeh traces a bold history of the interior lives of bondwomen as they carved out an existence for themselves and their families amid the horrors of American slavery. With particular attention to maternit…
 
Mexico City's public markets were integral to the country's economic development, bolstering the expansion of capitalism from the mid-nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries. These publicly owned and operated markets supplied households with everyday necessities and generated revenue for local authorities. At the same time, they were embedded in a wi…
 
Jordan Salama’s Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena (Catapult Press, 2021) is a travelogue for a new generation about a journey along Colombia’s Magdalena River, exploring life by the banks of a majestic river now at risk, and how a country recovers from conflict. An American writer of Argentine, Syrian, and Iraqi Jewish desc…
 
Welcome to the Main Street to the World Podcast where we will be talking everything travel each week. In this episode, are talking with our rep from La Coleccion Resorts by Fiesta Americana, Richard Bromberg. This is part 2. La Coleccion Resorts by Fiesta Americana is a resort group located in Mexico and in the Dominican Republic. The Main Street t…
 
Political Scientist Efrén Pérez’s new book, Diversity's Child: People of Color and the Politics of Identity (U Chicago Press, 2021), explores the term and category “people of color” and how this grouping has been used within politics, but also how it is has been used by those who are classified as people of color. Pérez examines group identity, lan…
 
Welcome to the Main Street to the World Podcast where we will be talking everything travel each week. In this episode, we continue chatting about Disney Genie after we have experienced it more. The Main Street to the World Podcast is hosted by April Botta, Whitney Mattox, & Lynne Macolini. We are proudly sponsored by Coasters & Castles Travel. For …
 
Who is the most fascinating historical figure that you have never heard of? David Lester and Marcus Rediker make a good case that it was Benjamin Lay. Based on Rediker’s 2017 The Fearless Benjamin Lay: The Quaker Dwarf Who Became the First Revolutionary Abolitionist, Lester has created a moving, engaging, and eye-opening graphic novel. Lay embodied…
 
Dominican women being seen--and seeing themselves--in the media Rachel Afi Quinn investigates how visual media portray Dominican women and how women represent themselves in their own creative endeavors in response to existing stereotypes. Delving into the dynamic realities and uniquely racialized gendered experiences of women in Santo Domingo, Quin…
 
Dominican women being seen--and seeing themselves--in the media Rachel Afi Quinn investigates how visual media portray Dominican women and how women represent themselves in their own creative endeavors in response to existing stereotypes. Delving into the dynamic realities and uniquely racialized gendered experiences of women in Santo Domingo, Quin…
 
Near Tijuana, Baja California, the autonomous community of Maclovio Rojas demonstrates what is possible for urban place-based political movements. More than a community, Maclovio Rojas is a women-led social movement that works for economic and political autonomy to address issues of health, education, housing, nutrition, and security. Border Women …
 
In the silliest episode so far, Lasse welcomes Cole McLeod back on Track Swap. They both brought scores from pretty goofy comedies and truly hope you like this music just as much as they do. Sit down, listen and have a good laugh!Sideshow Sound Theatre
 
In Reagan's Gun-Toting Nuns: The Catholic Conflict Over Cold War Human Rights Policy in Central America (Cornell UP, 2020), Theresa Keeley analyzes the role of intra-Catholic conflict within the framework of U.S. foreign policy formulation and execution during the Reagan administration. She challenges the preponderance of scholarship on the adminis…
 
In The Charismatic Gymnasium: Breath, Media, and Religious Revivalism in Contemporary Brazil (Duke University Press, 2021), Maria José de Abreu examines how Charismatic Catholicism in contemporary Brazil produces a new form of total power through a concatenation of the breathing body, theology, and electronic mass media. De Abreu documents a vast r…
 
Perhaps no other symbol has more resonance in African American history than that of 40 acres and a mule--the lost promise of Black reparations for slavery after the Civil War. In I've Been Here All the While: Black Freedom on Native Land (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021), we meet the Black people who actually received this mythic 40 acres, the American …
 
Have you ever wondered what our listeners think about the show? We’re excited to share with you some of the results from our May audience survey and focus group. The results have influence recent episodes topics (Dual Citizenship) and future topics. Listen as we go over some of the results and share with you. Listen to Kerry-Ann and Chris discuss h…
 
In this episode of the New Books in Latin America Podcast, Kenneth Sánchez talked to Joe Feldman about his wonderful book Memories before the State: Postwar Peru and the Place of Memory, Tolerance and Social Inclusion published in 2021 by Rutgers University Press. Memories before the State examines the discussions and debates surrounding the creati…
 
Edited by Diego Armus and Pablo Gómez, The Gray Zones of Medicine: Healers and History in Latin America (University of Pittsburgh Press 2021) tell the stories of health practitioners that thrived in a gray space between legality and criminality, the trajectories they followed, and the interstitial spaces they inhabited between official and unoffici…
 
There is romance in stealing from the rich to give to the poor, but how does that change when those perceived rich are elderly white North Americans and the poor are young Black Jamaicans? In this innovative ethnography, Jovan Scott Lewis tells the story of Omar, Junior, and Dwayne. Young and poor, they strive to make a living in Montego Bay, where…
 
There is romance in stealing from the rich to give to the poor, but how does that change when those perceived rich are elderly white North Americans and the poor are young Black Jamaicans? In this innovative ethnography, Jovan Scott Lewis tells the story of Omar, Junior, and Dwayne. Young and poor, they strive to make a living in Montego Bay, where…
 
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